Information

Aristaeus LST-329 - History


Aristaeus

In Greek and Roman mythology, the son of Apollo and the nymph Cyrene. Aristaeus is believed to have been born in Libya. tie later traveled to Thebes, where he received instruction from the Muses in the arts of healing and prophecy. Aristaeus is credited with introducing the cultivation of bees. He is also regarded as the protector of herdsmen and hunters.

(ARB-1: dp. 4,100; 1. 328'; b. 50'; dr. 11'2"; s. 11.6 k.; cpl. 260; a. 13", 8 40mm., 8 20mm.; cl. Aristaeus)

LST-329 was laid down on 12 November 1942 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard; reclassified ARB-1 on 25January 1943 and named Aristaeus; launched on I Februar

1943; s ponsored by Mrs. Arthur Taylor; converted at Fair field, Mg.., by the Maryland Drydock Co., for service as a battle damage repair ship; and commissioned on 18 May 1943, Lt. Ralph M. G. Swany, Jr., in command.

On 1 June, the ship got underway for Norfolk, Va. During the next six weeks, she conducted shakedown training out of Norfolk and in the Chesapeake Bay. On 23 July, she left the east coast and shaped a course for the Pacific. The vessel transited the Panama Canal and joined the Pacific Fleet on 1 August. She then continued on-via Bora Bora, Society Islands, and Tutuila, American Samoa-to Noumea, New Caledonia.

Aristaeus reached Noumea on 14 September and operated in its immediate vicinity through the remainder of 1943 and the first six months of 1944. Early in July 1944, she anchored at Sydney, Australia. After upkeep at that port, the repair ship journeyed to New Guinea in late September and provided battle damage repairs to vessels in this area into April 1945. On 1 May, she anchored at Kerama Retto, Ryukyu Islands.

The vessel remained at Kerama Retto during the next two months. As a member of Service Squadron 10, she performed battle damage and voyage repairs to various ships of the fleet. On 2 July, the ship moved her base of operations to Buckner Bay, Okinawa, where she provided routine repair services. On 13 August, she was ordered to assist in repairing the torpedoed Pennsylvania (BB-38). Many of the battleship's compartments were flooded, and she had settled heavily by the stern. Aristaeus repair efforts, however, enabled the man-of-war to get underway for Pearl Harbor on 24 August, nine days after the Japanese capitulation ended hostilities.

Aristaeus remained at Buckner Bay until early December. She left Okinawa on the 3d and shaped a course for the west coast of the United States. The ship reached San Francisco, Calif., on the 27th and entered a period of upkeep and repairs. She remained at San Francisco until 22 May 1946, when she got underway for San Diego, Calif. Upon her arrival there, the vessel reported to the San Diego Group, 19th Fleet, for inactivation. Aristaeus was decommissioned on 15 January 1947 and was placed in the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 1 July 1961. The vessel was sold to Brown Industries, Inc., Oakland, Calif., on 14 March 1962, and she was subsequently scrapped.

Aristaeus earned one battle star for her World War I I service.


Aristaeus LST-329 - History

USS Midas (ARB-5) on 29 May 1944
Click on this photograph for links to larger images of this class.

Class: ARISTAEUS (ARB-1)
Design: Navy LST
Displacement (tons): 1,781 light, 4,100 lim.
Dimensions (feet): 328.0' oa, 316.0' pp x 50.0' e x 11.2' lim
Original Armament: 1-3"/50 2-40mmQ 8-20mm (1943-44: ARB 1-6)
Later armaments: 2-40mmQ 8-20mm (1945: ARB 7-12)
Complement: 253 (1944)
Speed (kts.): 11.6
Propulsion (HP): 1,800
Machinery: G.M. diesels, 2 screws

Construction:

ARB Name Reclas. Builder Keel Launch Commiss.
1 ARISTAEUS 13 Jan 43 NYd Philadelphia 12 Nov 42 1 Feb 43 18 May 43
2 OCEANUS 13 Jan 43 NYd Philadelphia 12 Nov 42 11 Feb 43 22 May 43
3 PHAON 13 Jan 43 Dravo, Pittsburgh 17 Sep 42 30 Jan 43 5 Aug 43
4 ZEUS 3 Nov 43 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 17 Jun 43 26 Oct 43 11 Apr 44
5 MIDAS 3 Nov 43 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 31 Aug 43 24 Dec 43 23 May 44
6 NESTOR 3 Nov 43 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 13 Sep 43 20 Jan 44 24 Jun 44
7 SARPEDON 14 Aug 44 Bethlehem-Hingham SYs 11 Jul 44 21 Aug 44 19 Mar 45
8 TELAMON 14 Aug 44 Bethlehem-Hingham SYs 5 Dec 44 10 Jan 45 1 Jun 45
9 ULYSSES 14 Aug 44 Bethlehem-Hingham SYs 2 Nov 44 2 Dec 44 20 Apr 45
10 DEMETER 14 Aug 44 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 25 Oct 44 19 Jan 45 3 Jul 45
11 DIOMEDES 14 Aug 44 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 19 Oct 44 11 Jan 45 23 Jun 45
12 HELIOS 14 Aug 44 Chicago Bridge, Seneca 23 Nov 44 14 Feb 45 23 Jul 45

Disposition:
ARB Name Decomm. Strike Disposal Fate MA Sale
1 ARISTAEUS 15 Jan 47 1 Jul 61 14 Mar 62 Sold --
2 OCEANUS 24 Jan 47 1 Jul 61 3 May 62 Sold --
3 PHAON 1947 1 Jul 61 10 Aug 62 Sold --
4 ZEUS 30 Aug 46 1 Jun 73 10 Jul 74 Sold --
5 MIDAS 15 Jan 47 15 Apr 76 19 Nov 80 MA/S 19 Nov 80
6 NESTOR 29 Nov 45 3 Jan 46 9 Oct 45 Lost --
7 SARPEDON 29 Jan 47 15 Apr 76 14 Jan 77 Sold --
8 TELAMON 20 May 47 1 Jun 73 29 Jan 74 Sold --
9 ULYSSES 28 Feb 47 1 Jan 61 Jun 61 Trf. --
10 DEMETER 26 May 47 1 Mar 59 31 Jul 59 Sold --
11 DIOMEDES 3 Dec 46 1 Jan 61 Jun 61 Trf. --
12 HELIOS 3 Dec 46 10 Dec 77 19 Jan 62 Trf. --

Class Notes:
FY 1942 (ARB 3-6), 1943 (ARB 1-2), 1944 (ARB 7-12), all as LSTs. All were built under LST contracts and reclassified and fitted as ARB's before entering service.

Throughout 1942 the Navy looked for possible sources for additional auxiliary vessels, and it eventually found an answer in the LST program. In mid-1942 the landing craft program temporarily lost some of its urgency as plans for a 1943 Cross-Channel operation were deferred, and in October 100 of the 490 LSTs then on order were cancelled. The Navy apparently found that a few LSTs could be spared to fill other critical needs. On 3 Dec 42 COMINCH directed the conversion of three LSTs to repair ships for landing craft, and on 18 Dec 42 he directed that three more be converted to Battle Damage Repair Ships and two to Motor Torpedo Boat Tenders. On 2 Jan 43 three new hull type designations were proposed for these ships, respectively ARL, ARB, and AGP. The types and hull number assignments were approved by SecNav on 13 Jan 43. On 25 Jan 43 the LSTs designated to become ARB 1-2 and AGP-1 were changed from LST 326-328 to LST 328-330 to minimize unnecessary work by the shipbuilder, and this date is carried in BuShips records as the reclassification date for all three ARBs and both AGPs. Despite the reclassification dates shown here (which come from BuShips and OpNav records), the ships made the transit from the building to the conversion yards as LSTs, assuming their ARB designations and hull numbers only upon decommissioning and entering the conversion yard.

On 11 Jun 43, as part of a major review of auxiliary ship requirements, the Auxiliary Vessels Board stated that, with the great numbers of ships of all types in the various and extended operating areas, it considered that additional repair ships were essential at the earliest practicable date, and that in planning an auxiliary vessel conversion program for 1944 and 1945 the conversion of LSTs and EC2 ships to repair ships was the most expeditious and economical method of meeting maintenance needs. It noted that these converted ships could relieve to a great extent the need for installation of shore-based repair facilities in the forward operating areas. As part of this effort, it recommended that a program of six LST conversions to ARBs be authorized, three in 1944 and three in 1945. These ships were ARB 4-9.

On 2 May 44 the Auxiliary Vessels Board reviewed the construction program of ARBs and AGPs that it had authorized on 11 Jun 43 and concluded that the number of these ships provided for was inadequate. It recommended that three more ARBs of the LST type be constructed for delivery in the second quarter of 1945. These ships were ARB 10-12.

All units of the ARB-1 class were modified to ARB's by Maryland DD, Baltimore, Md., except ARB-3 by Tampa SB, Tampa, Fla. Units built on the Mississippi River were taken to New Orleans, where they were placed in full commission and remained for a few days for voyage repairs and loading of stores. Combat crews then delivered them to Baltimore, with a three-day shakedown enroute at St. Andrews Bay, Florida, to ensure their safe passage. Gibbs and Cox was the design agent for all three LST conversion designs. According to the history written by the crew of ARB-3, the main differences between an ARB and an LST were heavier armament, greater deck facilities for cargo handling, a much longer superstructure deck, and last and most important the tank deck covered with lathes, grinders, drills, metal cutters, welding machines, and other shop equipment. Its crew was larger than an LST crew and included a large number of highly specialized rated enlisted men trained in ship repair. In the ARBs, the bow ramp and bow door control gear were not to be installed during construction and the bow doors were welded shut. Two derricks each with a 10-ton boom and a 50-ton "A" frame were fitted. The first six ships of the class had a 3"/50 gun on the main deck at the extreme stern with a 40mm quad mount just forward of and above it. In these ships the entire stern anchor-handling rig with its 3,000 pound Danforth anchor was moved to the starboard bow to provide emergency anchoring facilities, although the anchor appears to have been quickly moved to a new hawse pipe. In the last six units the 3"/50 gun was omitted and the 40mm mount was moved to a raised platform on the extreme stern, under which the usual LST stern anchor was restored. All units had a single "A" frame crane on the port side amidships and two widely-spaced short kingposts forward, as in the earlier ARLs.


Contents

Aristaeus' presence in Ceos, attested in the fourth and third centuries BCE, Ζ] was attributed to a Delphic prophecy that counselled Aristaeus to sail to Ceos, where he would be greatly honored. He found the islanders suffering from sickness under the stifling and baneful effects of the Dog-Star Sirius at its first appearance before the sun's rising, in early July. In the foundation legend of a specifically Cean weather-magic ritual, Aristaeus was credited with the double sacrifice that countered the deadly effects of the Dog-Star, a sacrifice at dawn to Zeus Ikmaios, "Rain-making Zeus" at a mountaintop altar Η] following a pre-dawn chthonic sacrifice to Sirius, the Dog-Star, at its first annual appearance, ⎖] which brought the annual relief of the cooling Etesian winds.

In a development that offered more immediate causality for the myth, Aristaeus discerned that the Ceans' troubles arose from murderers hiding in their midst, the killers of Icarius in fact. When the miscreants were found out and executed, and a shrine erected to Zeus Ikmaios, the great god was propitiated and decreed that henceforth the Etesian wind should blow and cool all the Aegean for forty days from the baleful rising of Sirius. But the Ceans continued to propitiate the Dog-Star, just before its rising, just to be sure. ⎗] Aristaeus appears on Cean coins. ⎘]

Then Aristaeus, on his civilizing mission, visited Arcadia, where the winged male figure who appears on ivory tablets in the sanctuary of Ortheia as the consort of the goddess has been identified as Aristaeus by L. Marangou. ⎙]

Aristaeus settled for a time in the Vale of Tempe. By the time of Virgil's Georgics, the myth has Aristaeus chasing Eurydice when she was bitten by a serpent and died.

Issue

According to Pherecydes, Aristaeus fathered Hecate, goddess of witchcraft, crossroads and the night. Hesiod's Theogony suggests her parents were Perses and Asteria.


History

Early life

Aristaeus was born to god Apollo and the legendary warrior Cyrene. When he was born, Hermes fed him nectar and Gaea gave him immortality.

The nymphs taught Aristaeus beekeeping, cheese making and many other crafts. He decided to pass on his knowledge and skills to humanity.

Tale of Orpheus

Aristaeaus tried to get the romantic attention of the nymph Eurydice, but she got married to the musician Orpheus. Aristaeaus followed her into a forest during her honeymoon and ran while asking her to marry him. This caused that Eurydice to run away and accidentally get bitten by a snake. Aristaeaus didn't want to accept the blame so he ran away.

Marriage

Aristaeaus married Autonoe, daughter of the hero and King Cadmus of Thebes. They had two children: a son named Actaeon and a daughter named Macris.


Orpheus and Eurydice

A Classical myth of enduring love that has inspired artists, writers and composers for centuries.

Orpheus and Eurydice, hand in hand, walk away from the fiery underworld and its deities, Pluto and Proserpine. Orpheus, singer, musician and poet, carrying a lyre on his shoulder, had recently married Eurydice, but on the day of their wedding, ‘in the very bloom of her life’, she was bitten by a viper and died of its venom. Distraught with grief, Orpheus descended into the underworld determined to restore her to mortality. He pleaded with Pluto and Proserpine for her return and his eloquence ‘melted the hearts of the gods and the denizens of the underworld, and all fell silent’. Even Cerberus, the fierce three-headed dog that guards the gates of Hell, lies meekly at Proserpine’s feet.

The gods agreed to Eurydice’s return: Proserpine no doubt sympathetic as she recalled her own forceful abduction by Pluto. The only caveat was that Orpheus must not glance back at Eurydice until she was safely ensconced in the upper world. If he broke his word, she would descend once again into Hell.

In Peter Paul Rubens’ painting, Orpheus is depicted struggling to look ahead soon after the deities have consented to her return. On leaving the underworld, the lovers ascended a steep and misty path and, as they neared the earth’s rim, an anxious Orpheus looked behind for his bride, who fell and murmured a final farewell before dying again. ‘No reproach passed her lips’, according to Ovid in his Metamorphoses, because Eurydice now knew for certain that Orpheus loved her unconditionally.

The myth of Orpheus and Eurydice has inspired numerous works of art: in literature, a cast as diverse as Boethius, Rainer Maria Rilke, Thomas Pynchon and Carol Anne Duffy have created variants on its themes, while the filmmakers Jean Cocteau, in his trilogy – The Blood of a Poet (1930), Orphée (1950) and Testament of Orpheus (1959) – and Marcel Camus, with Black Orpheus (1959), have captured its resonant tragedy. Fittingly, it is in music that the myth’s greatest legacy lies. L’Orfeo, Claudio Monteverdi’s opera, the form’s earliest surviving masterpiece, composed in 1607, became the first of many musical dramas to tackle the story: Christoph Willibald Gluck (Orfeo ed Euridice, 1774), Jacques Offenbach (Orpheus in the Underworld, 1858), Harrison Birtwistle (The Mask of Orpheus, 1986) and Anaïs Mitchell’s current Broadway hit Hadestown, set in America’s Deep South, are among those to have added to a canon that continues to expand.

Rubens’ typically vivid Orpheus, which reveals the artist’s deep understanding of classical myth and allusion, was painted in the late 1630s.


Aristaeus the Elder

The details of Aristaeus the Elder's life are scanty, and the list of his writings—all of them lost—is in question. Some of this may be accounted for by a confusion with a figure of whom even less is known, if indeed he actually existed: Aristaeus the Younger. Of the elder Aristaeus, however, historians do know that he was among the originators of conics and conic section theory, a man judged a "worthy mathematician" by no less a figure than his contemporary Euclid (c. 325-c. 250 b.c.).

The few known facts about Aristaeus the Elder come from the writings of Pappus (fl. c. a.d. 320), who lived six centuries later. In his Treasury of Analysis, Pappus referred to Aristaeus as "the Elder," leading to the inference that there must have been another Aristaeus born later but this is the only indication that the other Aristaeus ever lived.

In Pappus's time, copies of Five Books Concerning Solid Loci still existed, and the later author used this work as a resource when discussing Aristaeus's ideas. The curves, lines, and points of cones were the subject matter of the book, which Euclid later credited as the source for much of his own writing on conics in Book XIII of his Elements. (Indeed, the latter may represent a version of at least part of Aristaeus's Five Books, edited and greatly amended by Euclid.)

According to Hypsicles (c. 190-c. 120 b.c.), Aristaeus also wrote another book called Comparison of the Five Regular Solids, in which he supposedly developed a theorem later applied by Apollonius (c. 262-c. 190 b.c.) in introducing his own comprehensive theory of conic sections. Some historians, however, believe that Comparison was written by the hypothesized younger Aristaeus.

Adding to the confusion surrounding Aristaeus the Elder is the fact that the "five" in the title of that second work calls to mind the name of the Five Books. Even more reminiscent of the title of Aristaeus's one confirmed work, however, is the name Five Books of the Elements of Conic Sections. The latter is allegedly yet another book by Aristaeus, and if it existed, it may have been written to further elucidate concepts explored in Five Books Concerning Solid Loci.

Whatever the details of Aristaeus's life, career, and writings, it is certain that he held a high place in the history of Greek geometry prior to Euclid. With the latter and Apollonius, he is regarded as one of the leading figures in the development of methods for analyzing conic sections.

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ENCYCLOPEDIA

ARISTAEUS (Aristaios), an ancient divinity worshipped in various parts of Greece, as in Thessaly, Ceos, and Boeotia, but especially in the islands of the Aegean, Ionian, and Adriatic seas, which had once been inhabited by Pelasgians. The different accounts about Aristaeus, who once was a mortal, and ascended to the dignity of a god through the benefits he had conferred upon mankind, seem to have arisen in different places and independently of one another, so that they referred to several distinct beings, who were subsequently identified and united into one. He is described either as a son of Uranus and Ge, or according to a more general tradition, as the son of Apollo by Cyrene, the grand-daughter of Peneius. Other, but more local traditions, call his father Cheiron or Carystus. (Diod. iv. 81, &c. Apollon. Rhod. iii. 500, &c. with the Schol. Pind. Pyth ix. 45, &c.) The stories about his youth are very marvellous, and show him at once as the favourite of the gods. His mother Cyrene had been carried off by Apollo from mount Pelion, where he found her boldly fighting with a lion, to Libya, where Cyrene was named after her, and where she gave birth to Aristaeus. After he had grown up, Aristaeus went to Thebes in Boeotia, where he learned from Cheiron and the muses the arts of healing and prophecy. According to some statements he married Autonoë, the daughter of Cadmus, who bore him several sons, Charmus, Calaicarpus, Actaeon, and Polydorus. (Hesiod. Theog. 975.) After the unfortunate death of his son Actaeon, he left Thebes and went to Ceos, whose inhabitants he delivered from a destructive drought, by erecting an altar to Zeus Icmaeus. This gave rise to an identification of Aristaeus with Zeus in Ceos. From thence he returned to Libya, where his mother prepared for him a fleet, with which he sailed to Sicily, visited several islands of the Mediterranean, and for a time ruled over Sardinia. From these islands his worship spread over Magna Graecia and other Greek colonies. At last he went to Thrace, where he became initiated in the mysteries of Dionysus, and after having dwelled for some time near mount Haemus, where he founded the town of Aristaeon, he disappeared. (Comp. Paus. x. 17. § 3.) Aristaeus is one of the most beneficent divinities in ancient mythology: he was worshipped as the protector of flocks and shepherds, of vine and olive plantations he taught men to hunt and keep bees, and averted from the fields the burning heat of the sun and other causes of destruction he was a theos nomios, agreus, and alexêtêr. The benefits which he conferred upon man, differed in different places according to their especial wants : Ceos, which was much exposed to heat and droughts, received through him rain and refreshing winds in Thessaly and Arcadia he was the protector of the flocks and bees. (Virg. Georg. i. 14, iv. 283, 317.) Justin (xiii. 7) throws everything into confusion by describing Nomios and Agreus, which are only surnames of Aristaeus, as his brothers. Respecting the representations of this divinity on ancient coins.

AGREUS (Agreus), a hunter, occurs as a surname of Pan and Aristaeus. (Pind. Pyth. ix. 115 Apollon. Rhod. iii. 507 Diod. iv. 81 Hesych. s.v. Salmas. ad Solin. p. 81.)

NO&primeMIUS (Noumios), a surname of divinities protecting the pastures and shepherds, such as Apollo, Pan. Hermes, and Aristaeus. (Aristoph. Thesmoph. 983 Anthol. Palat. ix. 217 Callim. Hymn. in Apoll. 47.)

Source: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.


Aristaeus

HS0215 is located on the ship Troubadour, as his brain is in a tank and his body presumed in another, but his body is not present as supposed to. HisAnima and the body are physically disassembled, they are connected however and the physical body is trying to escape the madness he is kept in. 

Appearance

Seen by Sergeant Jimmy Doyle on an earlier investigation upon exactly this ship, where they have found Mutant 10HSK0q. Physically, it has not much in common with either Montayne Lockley or Noah Giles. HS0215, or Aristaeus, has one grey iris and one which is faint green. (see Heterochromia iridum) His hair is light brown.  Although Jimmy Doyle had not detected any vital signs, he turned off the tank in which it lay until this moment that caused the physical body to remove itself in contact with its Anima . The latter is still in possession of total control of itself and the physical body the Anima is positioned on deck three of the ship while the body is on deck 1. To become one again, the body is trying to find the Anima.


Abilities & Powers

Aristaeus entering into his Olympian form.

Aristaeus is a powerful immortal Olympian demigod, and and the demigod representation of the Sun and Light, possessi near-absolute manipulation power the forces of solar and light like his father. He is capable of generating the primordial light that is capable of vanquishing the primal darkness of the cosmos. He is able to manipulate all aspects of the Sun, from its nuclear fission and the electromagnetic radiations.

As a immortal being, Aristaeus is immune to earthly diseases, virses and most toxsins, but can be intoxicated if he drinks too much alcohol. He had been shown to withstand blows that would normally kill a mortal entity, this is either showing his extraordinary physical durability as his muscles and bone density are greater then most demigods, or it's his immortality kicking in.

Being the demigod of Light, Aristaeus can become the shining destination in all the hearts drowned in corruption and inner conflict of becoming the opposite of one's true nature. He is able to purify almost any entity, and guide them down to the correct path to their true nature, the path of perfect harmony. He believes corruption is a imbalance in one's inner nature which leaks out and physically manifest itself. Apollo with his brilliant divine light, helps those to "cleanse" of their impurities and helps them the locate the path out to harmony.

As the demigod of plagues, Aristaeus is able to plague any land of life in the world, and bring diseases and viruses as divine judgment as the demigod of justice. Just as he plagues, he is also the healer, able to cure any and all vireses and diseases and restore anything to their optimal conditions.

Aristaeus's aura harming Selene.

Aristaeus's magical aura is a deadly force one should not approach when he's releasing it in Olympian form. His aura attributes to the same, if not hotter then the surface of the Sun itself, making him the ture surface of the Sun. This is shown when his human friend, Selene Ambrogio got too close and began to get burn just by going near him.

As a Olympian demigod, Apollo is a powerful god in both physcally and magically. He is able to withstand the attacks the titans during the Second Titanomachy and even withstand the blows of Atlas, a titan who said have such strength he can tear reality be punching alone. Even Zeus comments on his extraordinary powress.

Aristaeus, being the demigod representation of knowledge and prophecy, is capable of recounting past and future, and possess innate knowledge of various of subjects across history, philosophy, science, and much more. He is able to see the many predictions, the possible futures of everything, including of living beings and gods alike. He is able to also speak all known language across the world, and perfectly understand all forms of communications. His intellectual capability of understanding and processing is unrivaled in the camp, and of the mortal world, essentially being "Tony Stark", he is able to intuitively learn and understand information and process them at a accelerated rate.

Due to his innate knowledge, Aristaeus is a highly intuitive fighter, able to combat multple combatants of once. His reflexes and agility is well beyond the half-bloods of the camp, and his skill in specifically archery surpasses even Artemis' hunters surprisingly. He is also a master unarmed combatant, using both his strength and reactive speed in Martial Arts to swiftly take down foes of his choosing and is acrobatic, able to leap across buildings and scale many environments with ease.

Aristaeus using his lyre for Selene.

Aristaeus as the demigod of Music, is capable of producing any form of musical art that allows him to project all forms of music, from hip-hop, to even the calm melodies that can place even a God to sleep. His mastery over music allows him to calm down even the most wild of beasts, and tame anything with music alone. Selene shows great love in his music. Along with this, he is able to manipulate the concepts of music and in turn control sounds itself. He is able to project attacks with sound and vibrations in the air.


Contents

On 1 June, the ship got underway for Norfolk, Virginia. During the next six weeks, she conducted shakedown training out of Norfolk and in the Chesapeake Bay. On 23 July, she left the east coast and shaped a course for the $3. The vessel transited the Panama Canal and joined the Pacific Fleet on 1 August. She then continued on via Bora Bora, the Society Islands, and Tutuila, American Samoa to Noumea, New Caledonia.

Aristaeus reached Nouméa on 14 September and operated in its immediate vicinity through the remainder of 1943 and the first six months of 1944. Early in July 1944, she anchored at Sydney, Australia. After upkeep at that port, the repair ship journeyed to New Guinea in late September and provided battle damage repairs to vessels in this area into April 1945. On 1 May, she anchored at Kerama Retto in the Ryukyu Islands. The vessel remained at Kerama Retto during the next two months. As a member of Service Squadron 10 (ServRon 10), she performed battle damage and voyage repairs to various ships of the fleet. On 2 July, the ship moved her base of operations to Buckner Bay, Okinawa where she provided routine repair services. On 13 August, she was ordered to assist in repairing the torpedoed battleship Pennsylvania. Many of Pennsylvania ' s compartments were flooded, and she had settled heavily by the stern. Aristaeus ' repair efforts, however, enabled the man-of-war to get underway for Pearl Harbor on 24 August, nine days after the Japanese capitulation ended hostilities.


Schott Music

Aristaeus is unique as a melodrama, in that its text was specifically created by the composer for the purpose of his own musical work. Hans Werner Henze’s outstanding literary perception breaks new ground within the powerful language of antiquity, augmented by a web woven from mythology, operatic history and his own oeuvre.

In Aristaeus, we witness Aristaeus’ journey to the place of Eurydice’s death where he confesses he is her murderer. Henze introduces words from Ovid’s Metamorphoses in the concluding depiction of her second death in the underworld as an epilogue: ‘We all must take this way: here is our final dwelling place.’

Auftragswerk : Auftragswerk der Rundfunk-Orchester und -Chöre GmbH Berlin
Content text: I Ouvertüre
II Prolog
III Adagio
IV "Wir waren alle drei hingerissen. " - V "Die Reise geht nach Süden. "
VI Nachtstück
VII "Ich rufe laut. "
VIII Grave
IX "Ein Gestank von Petroleum verbreitet sich. "
X Einsam
XI "Und da ist nun ein zweites Lebewesen. "
XII (ohne Satzbezeichnung)
XIII "Ein Mondstrahl trifft die Schlafenden. "
XIV Moderato
XV "Hat Eurydike mich vergessen?"
XVI Lacrimosa
XVII "Eisschollen haben sich auftgetürmt. "
XVIII Epilog
XIX Finale
Performance duration: 48&apos0"
Publisher: Schott Music
Uraufführung : 1. Februar 2004 Berlin, Konzerthaus (D) Jubiläumskonzert - 10 Jahre DeutschlandRadio und 10 Jahre ROC Berlin · Martin Wuttke, Sprecher · Dirigent: Marek Janowski · Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin
Year of composition: 1997, rev. 2003
instrumentation: 3 (2. auch Picc. und Altfl., 3. auch Picc. und Bassfl.) · 3 (1. auch Ob. d’am., 2. auch Engl. Hr., 3. auch Heckelphon) · 3 (2. auch Es-Klar. und Bassklar., 3. auch Bassklar. und Kb.-Klar.) · Sopransax. (auch Altsax., Tenorsax.) · 3 (3. auch Kfg.) - 6 · 3 · 3 · 1 - 4 P. S. (I: kl. Tr.· gr. Tr. · Clav. · Zimb. · Handgl. · Röhrengl. · Loo-jon II: 5 Trgl. · Zimb. · 4 hg. Beck. · 3 Tamt. · 2 Metallpl. · Handgl. · Flex. · Guiro · Ratsche III: Tamb. · kl. Tr. · Tomt. · Boo-bams · 5 Herdengl. · Handgl. · Sistr. · Windmasch. · Vibr. IV: Tomt. · Tempelbl. · Lotosfl. · Glsp. · Marimba · Handgl.) - Git. · Hfe. · Cel. · Klav. - Str.
Delivery rights: worldwide

Aristaeus is unique as a melodrama, in that its text was specifically created by the composer for the purpose of his own musical work. Hans Werner Henze’s outstanding literary perception breaks new ground within the powerful language of antiquity, augmented by a web woven from mythology, operatic history and his own oeuvre.

In Aristaeus, we witness Aristaeus’ journey to the place of Eurydice’s death where he confesses he is her murderer. Henze introduces words from Ovid’s Metamorphoses in the concluding depiction of her second death in the underworld as an epilogue: ‘We all must take this way: here is our final dwelling place.’


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