Information

Paul Szep


Paul Szep was born in Hamilton, Ontario in 1941. He worked in steel mills and played semi-professional hockey while studying at the Ontario College of Art. After working as a cartoonist and illustrator with the Financial Post in Toronto, he joined the Boston Globe in 1967.

Szep was a strong opponent of the Vietnam War and his cartoons on Edward King, the governor of Massachusetts, resulted in him being sued for libel. Szep replied: "My goodness, a political cartoonist holding up a politician for ridicle. That's not libel, that's a job description." Szep won the Pulitzer Prize for cartooning in 1974 and 1977. He has produced several books of cartoons including


Paul Szep - History

David Conrod is Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of FocusPoint and LandC Investment, LLC. Mr. Conrod is a veteran private fund placement executive, with more than 25 years&rsquo experience fundraising and building profitable new financial services businesses. Prior to launching FocusPoint in 2010, Mr. Conrod was a Senior Managing Director at Guggenheim Partners, LLC, where he led the firm&rsquos institutional distribution initiatives globally. Mr. Conrod joined Guggenheim at the firm&rsquos inception in 2000 and for over a decade played a key role in the sourcing, diligence, and growth of six distinct Guggenheim-sponsored asset management entities. Collectively, these businesses raised $6 billion of limited partnership commitments. During his Guggenheim tenure, Mr. Conrod also established the firm&rsquos Private Fund Group and successfully obtained over $7 billion of fund allocations for general partnerships external to the firm. From 1992-1999, Mr. Conrod was Director of Sales and Marketing at HSBC Asset (Americas), Inc., where he was responsible for distributing the bank&rsquos private equity vehicles in Asia and Europe. Mr. Conrod earned an A.B. from Kenyon College and an M.B.A. from Columbia Graduate School of Business. Mr. Conrod serves on the Board of Directors of Rise Line Business Credit.

Robert Mortimer is Co-Founder and Managing Partner of FocusPoint. Mr. Mortimer is a tenured investment banker, with over 20 years&rsquo experience raising equity and debt for a variety of fund and transaction structures. Throughout his career he has specialized in understanding the specific needs of family office and insurance investors, maintaining relationships within these segments across North America, Europe, and the Middle East. At FocusPoint, Mr. Mortimer initiated and leads coverage of non-traditional limited partners, earning the firm its reputation for success in obtaining capital commitments from allocators not broadly known to the placement agent community. Prior to co-founding FocusPoint, Mr. Mortimer was a Managing Director at Guggenheim Partners, LLC from 2000 to 2010 and a principal contributor to the build-out and success of its Private Fund Placement group. Mr. Mortimer attended New York University as well as the Venture Capital Executive Program Certificate from the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business.

Cheryl Rogers is responsible for marketing to and raising capital from institutions and family offices in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast regions of the U.S., as well as parts of Canada. Prior to joining FocusPoint in 2010, Ms. Rogers was Vice President in the Private Fund Group at Guggenheim Securities, LLC. Before joining Guggenheim in 2005, she was a Project Manager at Penn, Schoen, & Berland Associates, a political consulting and marketing strategy firm. Prior to Penn, Schoen, & Berland Associates, Ms. Rogers worked at East Gate Capital Management & Private Equity. She graduated with a B.A. in International Relations from Stanford University.

Franklyn Chang is a Managing Director at FocusPoint. Mr. Chang has over 23 years of experience successfully raising institutional capital for private equity, private debt, real assets and real estate strategies. Since 2011, Mr. Chang has direct attribution to raising $4.1 bn of capital in North America, the Middle East and Europe. Prior to joining FocusPoint, Mr. Chang was a partner at Eaton Partners for eight years, including four years running the firm&rsquos European placement business. In addition to his experience as a third party fundraiser, Mr. Chang spent five years working in various senior level business development positions at large institutional asset managers. Mr. Chang began his finance career at BancAmerica Securities where he structured and led the syndication of middle market highly levered transactions. He received a B.S. from Manhattan College and an M.B.A. from The University of Chicago.

Russell Boggessis responsible for coverage in North America with emphasis on the Midwest, and some East Coast clients. Prior To Focus Point, Mr. Boggess ran his own consulting firm which advised a number of private equity, private credit and hedge funds on business development and was affiliated with R6 Capital. Before then, he was Director of Marketing for two New York based hedge funds: Kingdon Capital Management and Sandell Asset Management in New York. Mr. Boggess began his finance career at Thomas Weisel Partners in San Francisco in where he served as a vice president in the Venture Capital Service Group working with institutional investors. He holds a B.A. from the University of Colorado.

Camilla Davies is responsible for marketing and capital raising from institutions and family offices in the Westcoast and Midwest regions of the U.S.. Prior to joining FocusPoint, Ms. Davies was a Vice President at CAIS, an alternatives investment platform to the wealth management industry. Prior to CAIS, she worked at the Credit Suisse Private Bank in London in their Client Advisory Group from 2010 to 2011 where she was responsible for cross-selling the Private Bank&rsquos products and services to the Investment Bank and their clients. Previously, Ms. Davies worked as a Junior Investment Advisor at Credit Suisse Private Bank covering High Net Worth finance professionals from 2007 to 2010. She graduated with a B.A. in Psychology, Art History and Theory from The University of Sydney.

Kevin Pizzolo is responsible for marketing and capital raising from pension plans, institutions, and family offices across the Eastern US. Prior to joining FocusPoint, Mr. Pizzolo was a Financial Consultant with AXA where he held his financial advisory practice servicing both individuals and institutions. Mr. Pizzolo currently holds his FINRA Series 7, 63, & 65 licenses and has completed the Certified Financial Planner designation course through Fairleigh Dickinson University. He graduated with a B.A. in Economics from Fairfield University.

Akrati Agarwal is a member of the Project Management team where she is responsible for various deal management activities associated with the group&rsquos mandates including due diligence and preparation of marketing and transaction management materials. Prior to joining FocusPoint, Ms. Agarwal was an Investment Banking Associate in UBS&rsquos Financial Institution Group where she advised clients on various M&A and debt advisory transactions. Previously, Ms. Agarwal was a Consultant at Capgemini in the Capital Markets Group, managing large engagements across multiple geographies. Ms. Agarwal is a Series 79 and 63 registered person with FocusPoint Private Capital Group, which is a member of FINRA and a securities broker-dealer in the United States. She holds a B.A. in Economics from Tufts University and an MBA from Duke University.

Isel Fitzgerald is a member of the Project Management team where she is responsible for various deal management activities associated with the group&rsquos mandates including due diligence and preparation of marketing and transaction materials. Prior to joining FocusPoint, Ms. Fitzgerald was an Investment Banking Analyst in BofA Securities&rsquo Global Industrials Group where she advised clients on various M&A, debt, and equity transactions. Ms. Fitzgerald is a Series 79 and 63 registered person with FocusPoint Private Capital Group, which is a member of FINRA and a securities broker-dealer in the United States. She holds a B.A. in Government & Legal Studies from Bowdoin College.

Paul Szep serves as the FINOP for FocusPoint. With over 20 years of experience in public and private accounting, Mr. Szep has developed specialized skills in Accounting, Tax, and Operations for hedge funds, private equity funds, and broker dealers. Paul is also a FINRA Series 27 FINOP. Prior to joining FocusPoint in 2014, he held accounting manager titles for PEF Services, a private equity administrator, and Rothstein Kass & Co., an audit and administration firm for alternative investment funds. In the private market, he served as the Controller and Chief Financial Officer for a multi-billion dollar NY-based hedge fund from 2004- 2010. He graduated with a B.S. in Accounting from Montclair State University.

Michael Wychozowycz serves as the Assistant Controller for FocusPoint. Prior to joining the FocusPoint in 2014, Mr. Wychozowycz worked as a staff accountant for PEF Services, from 2011 to 2014, where he administered the back office accounting and reporting for multiple private equity clients.

Rashi Dhir is a Senior Consultant to FocusPoint. He is a Partner at DMD Advocates where he served as outside counsel to FocusPoint on its management buy-out. From 2002 to 2010, Mr. Dhir was Managing Director and General Counsel at Guggenheim Partners, LLC where he worked with David Conrod. Prior to Guggenheim Partners, LLC, he was Senior Associate at Clifford Chance US LLP and Senior Associate at Clifford Chance (Rogers & Wells). Mr. Dhir graduated from Delhi University where he was valedictorian and received a J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Louis Mattielli has held senior legal, compliance and administrative positions in several financial services firms over a lengthy career. He holds the Series 7, 10 and 24 FINRA licenses. He is a graduate of Saint Peter's College and New York Law School.


The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection of Caricature and Cartoon - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: Publication may be restricted. For information see "Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection . " https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/077_swan.html
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-84957 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: SWANN - no. 1365 (B size) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


There is currently no access to the elevator at Sherwood Branch. We’re working to fix it and will post updates on hpl.ca. Thank you for your patience.

Scathing wit, an ability for satire and a drawing style that transforms editorial cartoons into pieces of art, twice won Paul Szep American journalism’s most prestigious annual award. In 1974 and again in 1977 he received the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning.

A native of Hamilton, Paul attended Cathedral High School, where his early cartoons appeared in the yearbook. He soon branched out, drawing sports cartoons for the Hamilton Spectator. He attended the Ontario College of Art where he specialized in illustration and later landed a job with the Financial Post as an editorial and advertising illustrator.

Paul wanted to become a political cartoonist. Unable to find a cartooning position in Canada, he sent samples of his work to the Association of American Editorial Cartoonists. He was soon invited to try out for the Boston Globe and later was named as the paper’s first full-time political cartoonist. He stayed for 34 years and brought an outsider’s perspective to American readers during the days of Vietnam and Watergate, winning the respect of friends and critics alike. Former President Richard Nixon once called him the toughest political cartoonist in the country.

An avid golfer and a frequent guest at celebrity golf tournaments, Paul also contributes cartoons to Golf Digest and other golfing publications. The author of 13 books, his work has been syndicated nationally and internationally. Paul has caricaturized every American President from Lyndon Johnson to Bill Clinton. His work is cited on the website of the International Museum of Cartoon Art.


A Cultural History of Satirical Cartoons and Censorship

Articles in JSTOR illuminate the long history of satirical cartoons and censorship.

It was, essentially, an execution. Twelve people slaughtered at the office of the French satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo in response to the paper’s series of gleeful, pointed caricatures of the Prophet Muhammad.

Gerard Biard, the editor-in-chief of Charlie Hebdo, was in London at the time of the attack, and his response in the aftermath of the massacre captured much of the world’s shock. “I don’t understand,” he said, “how people can attack a newspaper with heavy weapons. A newspaper is not a weapon of war.”

The history of satirical cartoons suggests otherwise. A cartoon is designed to convey its message “quickly and ungently,” an urgent dispatch meant to swiftly strike a nerve. Political cartoons, wielded like tire irons by satirical artists, have been always been “instruments of tremendous editorial power,” able to “match any other media for invective,” a vehicle for “disseminating highly emotional attitudes.”

This is tremendous, potent power—a direct threat to its targets. Throughout the history of the political cartoon, targets have struck back.

In his article “Reconsidering the Decline of the Editorial Cartoon,” author Ilan Danjoux presents this incomplete list of attempts to silence artists by arrest, torture and execution:

• The torture of man artist named Pauson, for his attack on Greek leadership, was described by both Aristotle and Aristophanes.
• Honore Daumier, a French artist, was imprisoned for his lampooning of King Louis Philippe and his court.
• English Cartoonist David Low was placed on the Gestapo’s extermination list.
• Naji Ali was assassinated in 1987 for his criticism of Arab and Palestinian leaders.
• In 1998, Kurdish cartoonist Dogan Guzal criticized his government as weak, and was subsequently sentenced to 16 months in high-security prison.
• Charlie Hebdo has also been targeted before. In 2011 after the publication of an issue that billed the Prophet Muhammad as a “guest editor,” their offices were gutted by a firebomb.

A newspaper is undeniably a weapon of war, and its power can be measured against the efforts taken to disarm them. In the wake of the attack, almost 2 million people, which included more than 40 world leaders, gathered in the streets of Paris to remember the victims in what has been called “the largest public rally in France since World War II.”


Paul Szep

Reveal deeper insights into your organization's relationships
with RelSci Contact Aggregator.

Empower Your Business Applications with Industry-Leading
Relationship Data from the RelSci API.

Get Contact Information on the
World's Most Influential Decision Makers.

Discover the Power of Your Network with
RelSci Premium Products.

Forbes Private Capital Group (“FPCG”) is the leading independent financial advisory and capital formation firm focusing on private partnerships in private equity, hedge funds, credit, real estate, real assets and opportunistic strategies in both developed and emerging markets. FPCG represents a dynamic new partnership between G2 and F orbes Financial Services, LLC, a division of Forbes Media, which combines the world class financial services brand of Forbes with the global distribution expertise of the G2 fundraising team. This partnership provides FPCG with an unrivaled network of ultra high net worth and institutional investor relationships that will serve as an invaluable resource in the capital raising process.

Paul Szep is affiliated with FPCG LLC

Stay informed and up-to-date on your network with RelSci news and business alerting service. Nurture your network and further your business goals with smart intelligence on the people and companies that matter most to you.

Browse in-depth profiles on 12 million influential people and organizations. Find RelSci relationships, employment history, board memberships, donations, awards, and more.

Explore notable alumni from top universities and organizations. Expand your fundraising pool and make warm introductions to potential new business connections.

Harness the power of your relationships with RelSci Pro, the powerful platform for identifying relationship-driven business opportunities and connections that can propel your career forward.

Stay informed and up-to-date on your network with RelSci news and business alerting service. Nurture your network and further your business goals with smart intelligence on the people and companies that matter most to you.

Browse in-depth profiles on 12 million influential people and organizations. Find RelSci relationships, employment history, board memberships, donations, awards, and more.

Explore notable alumni from top universities and organizations. Expand your fundraising pool and make warm introductions to potential new business connections.

Harness the power of your relationships with RelSci Pro, the powerful platform for identifying relationship-driven business opportunities and connections that can propel your career forward.


The Library of Congress does not own rights to material in its collections. Therefore, it does not license or charge permission fees for use of such material and cannot grant or deny permission to publish or otherwise distribute the material.

Ultimately, it is the researcher's obligation to assess copyright or other use restrictions and obtain permission from third parties when necessary before publishing or otherwise distributing materials found in the Library's collections.

For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection of Caricature and Cartoon - Rights and Restrictions Information

  • Rights Advisory: Publication may be restricted. For information see "Caroline and Erwin Swann Collection . " https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/077_swan.html
  • Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-82942 (b&w film copy neg.)
  • Call Number: SWANN - no. 1363 (B size) [P&P]
  • Access Advisory: ---

Obtaining Copies

If an image is displaying, you can download it yourself. (Some images display only as thumbnails outside the Library of Congress because of rights considerations, but you have access to larger size images on site.)

Alternatively, you can purchase copies of various types through Library of Congress Duplication Services.

  1. If a digital image is displaying: The qualities of the digital image partially depend on whether it was made from the original or an intermediate such as a copy negative or transparency. If the Reproduction Number field above includes a reproduction number that starts with LC-DIG. then there is a digital image that was made directly from the original and is of sufficient resolution for most publication purposes.
  2. If there is information listed in the Reproduction Number field above: You can use the reproduction number to purchase a copy from Duplication Services. It will be made from the source listed in the parentheses after the number.

If only black-and-white ("b&w") sources are listed and you desire a copy showing color or tint (assuming the original has any), you can generally purchase a quality copy of the original in color by citing the Call Number listed above and including the catalog record ("About This Item") with your request.

Price lists, contact information, and order forms are available on the Duplication Services Web site.

Access to Originals

Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)

  • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
    As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
  • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.

Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?

  • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
  • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.


Pro-Am Win Would Be Real Prize for Paul Szep

1999-02-05 04:00:00 PDT Pebble Beach -- Not too many people can dismiss winning the Pulitzer Prize twice in their lives as if it were nothing much but preamble. But after the day he had yesterday at the AT&T, you could forgive Paul Szep for doing just that.

Szep and tournament co-leader Greg Kraft (66) combined for a 59 yesterday, giving them a two- stroke lead in the Pro-Am tournament over the team of Ken Griffey Jr. and Mark O'Meara.

"He was making so many birdies, I didn't have a chance to get near him," Kraft joked after an hour or so at the driving range following his round.

Szep has played in enough pro-am tournaments to know that not all professionals give their amateur partners the time of day, let alone go out of their way to be a resource.

"If you want him to read the green, he'll read the green," Szep said. "He's friendly. He's not aloof. He's concentrating on his game, but he's never so busy he doesn't have time for you. Believe me, some guys you play with. . . . well I won't name names."

Golfers with bad attitudes? Seems hard to believe, but it doesn't pay to argue with a man who makes his living carving people up in print. Szep won the Pulitzer twice in the 1970s, but lately he's put less of his time into political cartooning, doing just one a week for the Boston Globe.

He said that's just as well, given the bad-satire-of-a-bad-satire farce claiming the national political scene.

"Its already got redundant," he said. "Once you got past the cigar jokes, it's been all downhill. I'm sick of it."

Instead, Szep has a new project, a panel strip called "Top Secret," and he's done more golf artwork. In fact, he has been helping design the decanter handed out to all amateur players at the AT&T. "Last year we designed a decanter with Bill Murray on there," he said.


Tacky's Revolt Free

And yet, the Democrats care more for the American people than you seem too.

Perhaps. But what does that matter when he had absolutely no plan, nor intention, of distributing them to the people.

It is called inference. It is a necessary skill. You may want to try it sometime.

And that is exactly why he did it. He only prevented the Chinese and other Asians from entering the country. Europeans were were still m,ore than welcome to enter this country. But do not let facts get in the way of your fantasy.

Ask Montana Bill. He spews lies every day.

Trump is a racist, fascist, and a criminal. His own actions prove that each and every time he does something, or opens his mouth.

This is a flat out lie. Do us all a favor before you draw crap like this again. Take a class on politics and political theory and learn what “Marxism,” socialism, fascism, “Nazism”, nationalism, communism, capitalism, republicanism and democracy and learn the similarities and differences between them. In addition, you may also wish to take a couple of courses on American history, or at least read a book or two by a real historian. That way, when you draw your next cartoon you will not produce ignorant crap like this and thus display, for the entire world, how extremely clueless and ouyt of touch with reality you are.

Like I said, at least we have brains and can think for ourselves. All you and your ilk do is parrot what you see and hear on television and talk radio.


'Go to hell!' A divided America struggles to heal after ugly election

ELLSWORTH, Maine (Reuters) - “He lies,” huffed Janet Foster.

“And he’s a dirty old man,” chimed in her sister Jean as they discussed Donald Trump’s flaws a few days before he was elected the new president of the United States.

“Well, I am with him,” their brother Paul, 60, interjected, raising his voice over snacks of cheese, muffins and crackers in the family’s living room. “Hillary Clinton is like a puppet - you know it’s all scripted.”

The 2016 U.S. election was unprecedented in the way it turned Americans against each other, according to dozens of interviews in rural United States and across some of the most politically charged battleground states.

It divided families like the Fosters in rural Ellsworth, Maine, broke up friendships and turned neighbor against neighbor.

In a recent Reuters/Ipsos survey, 15 percent of respondents said they had stopped talking to a family member or close friend as a result of the election. For Democrats, this shoots up to 23 percent, compared to 10 percent for Republicans. And 12 percent had ended a relationship because of it.

There was no comparative polling data from previous elections. But interviews with relationship counselors and voters suggest this election stood out by summoning passions, anger and a divisiveness in ways that will make healing difficult after Clinton’s loss to Trump on Tuesday.

Sarah Guth, a Democrat in Colorado, says her father - an ardent supporter of Trump - no longer speaks with her after they clashed on Facebook over their political views.

“He crossed a line,” she said.

After attending a Trump rally, Guth wrote on Facebook that she saw 10 minorities among thousands of people. “I’m increasingly convinced that this election is about race,” she wrote. “I mean a fear among the white majority that their rule is coming to an end.”

Some posters told her “to go to hell,” she recalled in an interview. “And then my dad very publicly attacked me, telling me that I should be ashamed of myself.” The two have not spoken since.

Ty Turner-Bond, a 35-year-old black man in North Carolina, says he lost friends because of his support for Trump. Some called him an “Uncle Tom,” a slur for African Americans accused of deferring to white people others threatened violence.

In Springfield, a city on Ohio’s Mad River, Duke Level, 57, voted for Trump because he wanted “a wrecking ball” to hit Washington. The owner of Un Mundo Cafe isn’t surprised this election created divisions, and he fears they could get worse.

“This is one of those crossroads crisis moments in history,” he said.

Hours earlier, Trump rallied about 5,000 supporters a few miles away in a dirt-floored livestock arena. He blasted Clinton as “the most corrupt person ever to seek the office of the presidency,” drawing chants of “lock her up,” as well as a few of “string her up.”

Down the street, Richard Scott, 51, an African-American supporting Clinton, shook his head when told of those chants. Those words, he said, recalled 20th Century lynchings of black Americans - including in Springfield where a black prisoner was shot and hung from a pole on Main Street in 1904.

Weeks ago, he planted a Clinton sign in his yard. His neighbors put up Trump signs. Outside the funeral home he owns, a pro-Clinton sign was defaced with a “Hillary for Prison” sticker. “People are tense,” said Scott.

The election hardened an already-clear racial divide in the former industrial city of 60,000 people - a snapshot of America at about 75 percent white and 18 percent black. Interviews with residents suggested its northern areas, mostly affluent and white, would vote for Trump, while its mostly black, lower-income southern section would largely support Clinton.

“There is a division in this town, economically and racial. And we saw that in this election,” said Bob Leath, 58, owner of Buckeye PC Repair who voted for Trump to “clean house” in Washington. “If you voted for Clinton, you were most likely either young, lower-income or from the south side of the area.”

For some, the tensions reach the bedroom. Sam Nail, a Cincinnati marriage counselor, said he has two couples who cited the election season as a “stressor” in their relationship.

Much of the anger gets uncorked on social media and will be hard to undo. Some is well publicized. National Review writer David French has written about “an unending torrent of abuse” he and his family faced online from white nationalist Trump supporters, including a Tweeted image of his 7-year-old daughter’s face in a gas chamber.

Others are less well known, like Brenda Thomas’ tangles with her older brother on Facebook. She says her brother unleashed a daily stream of Facebook posts on Clinton and President Barack Obama that she found objectionable. She said when her husband, a Republican, tried to reason with him, he was “unfriended” on Facebook.

“I feel that I have to walk on eggshells with him and it causes problems at family functions,” said Thomas, 63, of Elizabethtown, Kentucky.

In Charlotte, North Carolina, Karen Wilson, describes this election as “stressful” on Facebook. “I’ve got family members who are mad at me for deleting entire Facebook threads when I thought they were becoming too negative. I’ve deleted Facebook friends who I realized I never should have been friends with in the first place,” said Wilson, 43.

Fourteen percent of respondents in the Reuters/Ipsos poll said they had blocked a family member or close friend from social media because of the election. For Democrats, this rises to 23 percent compared to 8 percent for Republicans.

The divisions tore into the fabric of some communities. In Provo, Utah, Trump supporter Loy Brunson awoke on an October morning to find his car spray-painted with the words “AmeriKKKa” - a reference to “KKK” white supremacists - and “Fuck Trump.” His two Trump yard signs were destroyed.

“So I doubled down, got motivated and put up 85 signs in my yard,” he said. Within days, all but six of those were stolen.

“This was more than vandalism,” he said in an interview. “This was a free speech attack.”

Some blame the divisiveness on campaign rhetoric that inflamed racial, ethnic and class tensions that have long simmered in America. Angry and extremist language moved into the mainstream.

George Lakoff, a linguistics professor at University of California, Berkeley, blames Trump’s use of language, which he ranks as among the most violent of any candidate in modern times. He specifically notes Trump’s suggestion in August that gun rights activists could take matters into their own hands if Clinton defeated him, as well as the New York businessman’s comments that she should go to prison.

“When you have extremes of that order, you have extremes of anger, extremes of fear,” Lakoff said.

In Mississippi, Chad Scott, an activist in the Clay County Republican Party, fears a post-election split between the party’s working-class Trump supporters and business-minded elites - a sentiment echoed in Maine, where Foster, the Ellsworth resident at odds with his sisters, witnessed the election’s political vitriol first hand.

Foster’s van was one of 20 vehicles spray-painted outside a Trump rally on Oct. 15 in the city of Bangor. And across Ellsworth, pro-Trump yard signs were stolen almost as fast as they were planted, Republican officials say.

Foster worries about the divisions ahead.

“My sisters will forgive me for my political views,” he said. “But the country is going to be on fire.”

Additional reporting by Greg Lacour in Charlotte, North Carolina and Nick Carey in Chicago, editing by Ross Colvin


Watch the video: Paul Szep: The Daily Szep -- Caricature of Bradley Manning (January 2022).