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Sunken Natchez Trace



The 6 most rewarding hikes in Mississippi

Mississippi has so many fabulous places to go for a walk that this was not an easy list to come up with at all! I guess it depends on what benefits you get out of the hiking experience – everyone gets something different out of hiking.

Some of the most common benefits that I’ve heard people talk about include exercise, peace of mind, fresh air, return to nature, and sense of accomplishment.

Here is a handful of hikes in Mississippi that I think best exemplify those five traits.


Meet the Natchez chef who is teaching the origins of soul food

Chef Jarita Frazier-King — Photo courtesy of Jarita King

Visitors flock to Natchez, Mississippi, the oldest city in the state, year after year to get a glimpse of the past. The over-300-year-old destination on the Mississippi River is known for its antebellum homes, which operate tours throughout the year. But this “Old South” imagery is just one part of Natchez’s history.

The city is the southernmost point of the Natchez Trace Parkway, a Native American trading route-turned-scenic byway. Mississippian tribes lived in the area as far back as 1250 AD, building the nearby Emerald Mound. The city’s name comes from the Natchez people. There’s also an Irish presence, along with influences from neighboring Louisiana.

Jarita Frazier-King, owner of the Natchez Heritage School of Cooking, seeks to challenge the misconceptions about what Southern food entails, focusing on the African diaspora, including the enslaved people that worked on the plantations in Natchez and throughout the South.

She’s been featured by the James Beard Foundation and the Museum of Food and Drink in New York, and she runs the Soul Food Fusion Festival, which benefits disengaged youth in the community.

“We teach people about the roots and history of soul food dishes, particularly what we call ‘classic cuts’ of soul food and how the African Americans and Native Americans influenced most of the food that we eat here in the south, food that we eat today,” says King.

Cornbread in particular is one of the dishes few people know the history of, which she discusses in her lectures.

Cornbread is a staple across a multitude of cultures. — Photo courtesy of Getty Images / GMVozd

“I call it the universal staple because in pretty much almost every culture, whether it be Jewish, Irish, Native American, African American, cornbread is always a staple that you have with some sort of meal. Whether it be fry bread in the Native American [culture] or some kind of seed bread in another culture, cornbread is still the base of it.”

King’s inspiration for her cooking also comes from her own heritage. She is an 8th-generation descendant of a union between George Fitzgerald, a Scottish Irish man, and Mary, a Jamaican slave woman. Her family tree is on display at the Natchez Museum of African American Culture and History and also includes Native American ancestry.

Her grandmother, a local baker, was one of fourteen children, so King has a large extended family. Many of their gatherings, including family reunions, center around food.

“I’ve been standing up on a stool cooking since I was five years old,” said King. She also worked as a community nutrition specialist at Alcorn State University in nearby Lorman before leaving to start her own business.

Since starting the cooking school in 2017, King has continually welcomed visitors to the kitchen like they’re family.

“I like to say, it’s like stories on a plate, because it’s more of an experience that you get when you’re at Natchez Heritage School of Cooking. We like to put people right there in grandma’s kitchen, at your grandparents’ house, taking you back to that scene or just to have that feeling.”

Here, the curious can learn to make dishes with traditional ingredients, such as black eyed pea and collard green fritters. Everything happens as a group, with each person being assigned a different element of the dish. The class ends with everyone sharing a meal together.

Overlooking the Mississippi River from Natchez — Photo courtesy of Caroline Eubanks

“We do what you would see in African American culture and Native American culture. People sitting down and doing things together as a group…we give them a wooden spoon when they leave the cooking school and we ask them to send us back a picture of them in the kitchen doing something with their families.”

King also recognizes food’s ability to bring people of all backgrounds together, something instilled by her great-grandmother.

“She always says we didn’t know no color, we were all family. That’s just how I was raised. That’s the same thing that I want people to take away from the cooking school…for one day, race, color, none of that matters, we all come together at the table and are the same at the table, just like family.”

While the pandemic has changed how her business runs, it’s renewed an interest in the traditional ways of making food, and has reminded people of the importance of family and community – and sharing meals together around the table.


Clarksdale

Coahoma County City Population 18,883
Coahoma County Tourism Commission

Bluestown Music

Bluestown Music is locally owned by guitar artist Ronnie Drew. Ronnie has a great collection of new and vintage guitars available. He also repairs guitars and other stringed instruments. A great place to stop in and play guitar with Ronnie.

Carnegie Public Library Archaeology Collection

Collection of Mississippi pottery and artifacts. Archaeological research materials. Closed national holidays. Mon - Thu, 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Fri, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sun, 1 - 5 p.m. Free.

Cat Head Delta Blues & Folk Art

Cat Head specializes in all things Delta Blues. Cat Head’s website and in-store chalkboard track blues shows in the Mississippi Delta. Gift shop.Tours by appointment. Mon - Sat, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free.

Deak Harp

Deak makes custom harmonicas to order and carries a selection of harmonicas and other blues related items in this one-of-a-kind shop. He also repairs harmonicas and offers lessons when he is not somewhere playing.

Clarksdale Walk of Fame

Bronze plaques, highlighting local persons of national or international recognition, are installed in sidewalks throughout downtown Clarksdale.

The Crossroads

Legend has it that bluesman Robert Johnson sold his soul to the devil at the Crossroads for the ability to play blues music. Have a picture made at the iconic marker.

Delta Blues Museum

Blues enthusiasts will enjoy a visit to this museum, packed with blues artifacts and memorabilia. Mar - Oct: Mon - Sat, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Nov - Feb: Mon - Sat, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. After hours and Sundays, by appointment. Admission.

Delta Bohemian Tours

Customized to your particular interests: blues sites, Mississippi River, oxbows, lakes, agriculture, countryside homes and churches, sunset photo ops, you name it. A real and personal Mississippi Delta experience.

Gimme Gumbo Gallery

Art gallery featuring blues-related art: blues musicians, song titles, lyrics and traditions captured in paintings and objects by blues-loving artists. Works by John Fewkes, mouth painter Cindi Bernhardt and Susan Conditt. Open during festivals and by appointment.

Ground Zero Blues Club

Ground Zero Blues Club features performances by both local and national blues bands and is co-owned by Oscar-winning actor Morgan Freeman. Lunch served Mon - Fri, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Live music, Wed - Sat.

Hambone Gallery

Folk and fine-art gallery owned by International Blues Festival artist Stan Street. Home of the Hambone Festival. Tue - Sat, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Live music, Tue, 7 - 10 p.m. Free.

Historic Walking District

Walking tour of the beautiful historic district of Clarksdale including Tennessee Williams Park and historic homes. Among them is the former home of the thirty-eighth Gov. Earl Brewer.

Hopson Plantation

Old commissary filled with antiques and artifacts pertaining to the culture surrounding the Mississippi Delta. Features one of the first mechanized cotton pickers. Open year-round. By appointment. Free.

Muddy Waters’ Cabin Site & Marker

The cabin where legendary bluesman Muddy Waters grew up was once located on the Stovall Plantation. Mississippi Blues Trail marker on site. The actual cabin is now on display inside the Delta Blues Museum. Drive-by.

The New Roxy

The New Roxy is a former movie theater located in the historic New World District of downtown Clarksdale. Vibrant music, art and theater venue.

Norman Brown Fine Art Gallery

The Cutrer Mansion Ball Room also houses the Norman Brown Fine Art Gallery. The gallery showcases local Clarksdale artist.

North Delta Museum

Located on the banks of the Mississippi River, this museum houses artifacts from the Mississippi Delta spanning prehistoric fossils to early 20th century agricultural and household items. Open 9 a.m. - 12 p.m., Monday-Saturday.

Quapaw Canoe Company

Choose a day tour or an extended tour on the mighty Mississippi River in a hand-carved canoe. Featured in National Geographic Adventure Magazine and on Food Network. No experience necessary.

Red’s Lounge

Authentic Mississippi Delta juke joint offers performances by Mississippi artists.Open every weekend and most weeknights. Admission.

Tennessee Williams Rectory Museum

Childhood home of Tennessee Williams located in the St. George's Episcopal Church Rectory. Open during festivals and by appointment. Text 646.465.1578 to schedule an appointment.

W.C. Handy Home Site & Marker

W.C. Handy (1873-1958), the “Father of the Blues,” lived at this site from 1903 to 1905. Drive-by.

WROX Museum

Museum is located in the building from which WROX radio was broadcast and where famous radio personality Early Wright entertained us all with his ad libs while spinning the latest records. A huge collection of everything associated with radio and music. Open during festivals and by appointment.


The city of Natchez is named after the Natchez tribe who lived in the area long before the French arrived, making it one of the oldest inhabited parts of Mississippi. After a series of conflicts in the 1730s between the colonizing French and the Indigenous people, resulting in hundreds of deaths on both sides, the French gained control of the area only to lose it all following the Seven Years’ War with Great Britain.

The British only enjoyed their rule over Natchez for about 20 years before the territory was ceded to the U.S. following the Crown’s defeat in the Revolutionary War. This shift in ownership caused a schism between the U.S. and the Spaniards, the latter of which had taken Natchez from British troops. The U.S. prevailed, however, and the territory became theirs. The area’s economy continued to grow on the backs of its enslaved people, and its well-placed river port made it particularly enticing for traders. In fact, Natchez’s economy was doing so well that it actually had more millionaires than any other city in the U.S. before the Civil War. Despite becoming the center of the Confederacy’s war efforts due to its cotton exports and booming port, much of the city was spared during the Civil War, including its many antebellum mansions. In September of 1862, Confederate forces surrendered the town of Natchez to the Union Army without resistance.

As a result, Natchez was spared much of the destruction that many other prominent Southern cities suffered. This not only helped to preserve the ornate structures therein but also better allowed Natchez to recover economically from the war.


‘Fighting Devil’s Backbone’: A story about the Natchez Trace

A widow with two sons and no family to help her, Sarah Perkins faced a bleak future remaining in Pennsylvania with her boys in 1809, so she got them passage on a keelboat to Nashville.

From there, they would take the Natchez Trace, which ran from Nashville to Natchez, Mississippi and the southwest Mississippi frontier.

“Imagine the courage that took,” said Tony Turnbow, a Williamson County attorney turned historian and author.

Just eight years earlier, in 1801, President Thomas Jefferson sent soldiers to convert the Natchez Trace, an old Indian trail running from Nashville to the busy seaport of Natchez, Mississippi, into a wagon highway. It was one of the first highways built by the federal government.

In his first children’s book, “Fighting the Devil’s Backbone The Shadow of E.Z.’s Fear,” Turnbow brings that piece of history to life with tales of “cutthroat” bandits, Indian raids and spies who terrorized those traveling along the Natchez Trace, better known as the “Devil’s Backbone.”

Perkins and her boys traveled down the Cumberland River to Nashville, where they disembarked and the boys experienced the first of many new adventures.

After meeting other families heading for the Natchez Trace and a new life, they joined their wagons and continued on to Franklin, staying at Whites Tavern on Margin Street — where the Old, Old Jail, aka the McConnell House, is now located — and waited for a few more families to join them. Meanwhile, the boys had a number of encounters, adventures and learned more about the wilderness they were about to enter.

“The [original] Natchez Trace had several different trails and roads,” Turnbow said. “At that time, it started at Granny White [Pike], and the Indian Trail ran through Franklin to Leiper’s Fork at Garrison Creek and continued southwest from there. This is an early period of our history — a missing part the early history of Franklin.”

In 1809, the southwest frontier offered land and possibilities. Many influential people came through the Williamson County area on their way to New Orleans and other Southern towns, Turnbow said.

In “Fighting Devil’s Backbone,” E.Z. (pronounced “Easy”) and his younger brother, David, find as the “men of the family” they have to quickly learn survival skills to provide for their mother and the community of people with whom they travel the dangerous route.

“The Natchez Trace became the ‘Cradle of Southern Culture,’ where people from the Northeast and East Coast started out heading further southwest to find homes,” Turnbow said. “People wanted the opportunity to own their own land. All the good land had already been purchased in the East.”


There’s That Word Again!

I was enjoying Why I Live at the P.O. when out of the blue Sister uses the N word. Not only does she address the little girl with the word, she also tells the girl to do her bidding. Sister did not ask if she could borrow the wagon or if the girl had other errands to run, but said, “Come help me haul these things down the hill.”

Sister’s need to control something has her ordering around a little black girl. I get the concept without the word. The girl took nine trips up and down the hill, and Uncle Ronda is the one to throw her a nickel for her troubles. Does Sister offer her any compensation? No. The child is merely her slave for a day.

Last summer, I spent time reading all of Flannery O’Connor’s work for the Southern Reading Challenge . At first I did not like her. Not one iota! Her benign use of the N word set me off. Just as Welty, I got the point without all the word usage, but then I realized she wasn’t trying to make a point. The N word was just a vocabulary choice and not meant to set my teeth. I went back and reread O’Connor’s work and these are my thoughts at the time, and this is my copy written for the newspapers that following week.


JenClair, a bloggie friend, had the same complaint (scroll down to the Hey Maggie post) upon reading O’Connor. Her source of relief came in the form of O’Connor’s book, Letters of Flannery O'Connor: The Habit of Being. I decided to look in Suzanne Marrs’ Eudora Welty: A Biography for answers.

Editor John Ferrone recalled her request: “Eudora wrote to correct a typo in the story ‘Powerhouse’ and another in ‘Ladies in Spring.’ Then she said there was a third change, not due to a typesetter’s error but a ‘way of speech forty years ago.’ She wanted the word ‘nigger’ to be deleted from ‘Why I Live at the P.O.’ In a later letter, she asked to have it deleted wherever it appeared, explaining that while it cropped up naturally in conversation in the older stories, 1980s readers might find it ‘throbbing with associations not then part of it.’ She decided instead to review the offensive word case by case, because in the end it was dealt with in several ways.” (452)

Marrs continues in the same paragraph: “In Eudora’s stories, narrative voice was seldom unitary, and in the 1930s and 1940s, it at times shifted into voices of white characters for whom nigger was a culturally inherited concept and who unselfconsciously and obtusely used the term without thought of or care for its effect. Given the political climate of 1980, however, Eudora feared that such characters might seem more bullying than benighted and that her stories might be misconstrued.” (453)

Can you as reader guess my question? Miss Welty intentionally left the offending words in Sister’s speech. I saw Sister using them in a bullying fashion, but given the silliness of Sister’s character, I must be wrong. Did I fall into the 1980s reader of which Miss Welty spoke?


There’s That Word Again!

I was enjoying Why I Live at the P.O. when out of the blue Sister uses the N word. Not only does she address the little girl with the word, she also tells the girl to do her bidding. Sister did not ask if she could borrow the wagon or if the girl had other errands to run, but said, “Come help me haul these things down the hill.”

Sister’s need to control something has her ordering around a little black girl. I get the concept without the word. The girl took nine trips up and down the hill, and Uncle Ronda is the one to throw her a nickel for her troubles. Does Sister offer her any compensation? No. The child is merely her slave for a day.

Last summer, I spent time reading all of Flannery O’Connor’s work for the Southern Reading Challenge . At first I did not like her. Not one iota! Her benign use of the N word set me off. Just as Welty, I got the point without all the word usage, but then I realized she wasn’t trying to make a point. The N word was just a vocabulary choice and not meant to set my teeth. I went back and reread O’Connor’s work and these are my thoughts at the time, and this is my copy written for the newspapers that following week.


JenClair, a bloggie friend, had the same complaint (scroll down to the Hey Maggie post) upon reading O’Connor. Her source of relief came in the form of O’Connor’s book, Letters of Flannery O'Connor: The Habit of Being. I decided to look in Suzanne Marrs’ Eudora Welty: A Biography for answers.

Editor John Ferrone recalled her request: “Eudora wrote to correct a typo in the story ‘Powerhouse’ and another in ‘Ladies in Spring.’ Then she said there was a third change, not due to a typesetter’s error but a ‘way of speech forty years ago.’ She wanted the word ‘nigger’ to be deleted from ‘Why I Live at the P.O.’ In a later letter, she asked to have it deleted wherever it appeared, explaining that while it cropped up naturally in conversation in the older stories, 1980s readers might find it ‘throbbing with associations not then part of it.’ She decided instead to review the offensive word case by case, because in the end it was dealt with in several ways.” (452)

Marrs continues in the same paragraph: “In Eudora’s stories, narrative voice was seldom unitary, and in the 1930s and 1940s, it at times shifted into voices of white characters for whom nigger was a culturally inherited concept and who unselfconsciously and obtusely used the term without thought of or care for its effect. Given the political climate of 1980, however, Eudora feared that such characters might seem more bullying than benighted and that her stories might be misconstrued.” (453)

Can you as reader guess my question? Miss Welty intentionally left the offending words in Sister’s speech. I saw Sister using them in a bullying fashion, but given the silliness of Sister’s character, I must be wrong. Did I fall into the 1980s reader of which Miss Welty spoke?


Karl Andreevich Shilder

Engineer-General Karl Andreevich Schilder is credited with having constructed the first submarine in Russia with an iron hull. Built at the Alexandrovsky Works plant in St. Petersburg and completed in May 1834. The boat had an egg-shaped form, two towers with access hatches and was equipped with an optical viewing tube, one of the first periscope devices for submersibles. An armament of mines and two triple-tube mountings for launching rocket projectiles was to be provided. To defeat an enemy vessel by using the mine it was necessary to stick a core of the mine in a hull, to move away to a safe distance and to blow up the mine by electric fuse.

Trails took place in September 1834 on the Neva River and the nearby island of Kronshtadt in the Gulf of Finland. The craft demonstrated an ability to submerge and was judged quite successful. An improvement version, equipped with diving plane to help control the craft underwater, was constructed in 1835, and with this second boat Schilder successfully destroyed a target ship with a mine in July 1838.

Trails with this boat were regularly conducted near Kronshtadt through 1841, but after some unexplained failure during trails in the fall of that year, Schilder was ordered to halt further experiments-as the boat was recognized unable for combat purposes. Lieutenants Zhmelev and Adamopulo were the first submarine commanders in Russia.

Specifications Schilder’s design (1834):

Displacement (srf/sub tons): un known

Propulsion: man-powered “vanes”, akin to fish fins

Speed (srf/sub knots): un known /1.5

Armament: 2 triple-tube mountings for launching rocket projectiles

Karl Andreevich Schilder

Born Dec. 27, 1785 (Jan. 7, 1786), in the village of Simanovo, in what is now Nevel’ Raion, Pskov Oblast died June 11 (23), 1854, in Călărasi, Rumania. Russian military engineer. General of the engineers (1852) adjutant general.

Shilder graduated from a school for column leaders in 1806 and served in the engineer troops as commander of a sapper company and a battalion and as chief of engineers of a corps and of an army. He fought in the battle of Austerlitz (1805), the defense of Bobruisk (1812), the Russo-Turkish War of 1828–29, and the Crimean War of 1853–56. He distinguished himself in action during the siege of Varna in 1828, the sieges of Silistra and Sumla in 1829, and the forcing of the Danube in 1854. Shilder died of wounds received at Silistra during the Crimean War of 1853–56.

Shilder developed a new and more effective system of countermining, using horizontal and inclined passages rather than vertical shafts. He also devised antipersonnel mines, stone fougas-ses, and canister mines. He produced an original design for a suspended rope bridge in 1828 and a “wineskin bridge” of quickly assembled, portable pontoons made of rubberized canvas in 1836. Between 1832 and 1836, Shilder and P. L. Shilling developed a method of setting off powder charges electrically. Between 1838 and 1848, Shilder and B. S. Iakobi built electrochemical and electrochemical-contact naval mines. Shilder provided the designs for the world’s first all-metal submarine, built in 1834, and the Otvazhnost’, built in 1846 the world’s first steamship armed with artillery and rockets, the Otvazhnost’ was a prototype of the destroyer. Among Shilder’s students were the talented engineers E. I. Totleben and M. M. Boreskov.

Maziukevich, M. N. Zhizn’ i sluzhba general-ad”iutanta K. A. Shildera. St. Petersburg, 1876.

Iakovlev, V. V. Kratkii ocherk istoriipodzemnoi minnoi voiny. Moscow, 1938.

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Issue [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Capitulation [ modifier | modifier le code ]

«Le 24 au matin, les Natchez, voyant que nous les serrions de fort près, que nos doubles grenades et le canon les incommodaient très fort, quoique nous ne leur tirassions que de loin en loin, arborèrent un drapeau blanc à sept heures du matin et m'envoyèrent un sauvage qui parlait un peu français. Je lui dis qu'avant de me parler de rien, ils eussent à me renvoyer tous les nègres qui étaient dans le fort. Ce qu'ils firent sur le champ. Dix-neuf nègres et une négresse arrivèrent aussitôt. Ils me dirent que les autres avaient été tués, et que six étaient en chasse avec quelques-uns de leurs gens. Je dis au même sauvage que je ne voulais donner ma parole sur rien, que je n'eusse les chefs dans notre camp. Il vint d'abord le nommé Saint-Côme, soleil de la nation, que je renvoyai en lui disant que je voulais que le grand chef, celui de la Farine [ 8 ] et lui vinssent ensemble, sans quoi, j'allais continuer de les battre en brèche (bombarder). Malgré le mauvais temps, ils se rendirent à notre camp sur les quatre heures du soir». Après bien des difficultés, provenant d'une juste méfiance, les chefs sauvages donnent leur consentement. Perier et les chefs sauvages, qui se trouvent être le Grand Soleil, Saint-Côme le Petit Soleil et le chef de la Farine, se rencontrent entre le camp et le fort. Mais il pleut et Perier les invite à s'abriter dans une petite cabane voisine, qu'il leur désigne du doigt. A peine y sont-ils entrés qu'ils sont faits prisonniers. «Ils me dirent d'abord qu'ils savaient avoir commis une grande faute et qu'ils n'osaient demander la vie, mais prièrent qu'on voulût bien l'accorder à leurs femmes et à leurs enfants. Je leur répondis que je l'accorderais même aux hommes, pourvu qu'ils se rendissent le lendemain: que passé ce temps de grâce, je ferais brûler ce qui n'en profiteraient pas. Ils me dirent que la chose était juste» [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .

La nuit tombant, quelques Natchez parviennent à s'enfuir dans la pénombre. «Cependant, à minuit, le chef de la Farine, qui était dans une tente, gardé par douze personnes, tant français que sauvages des plus alertes, se sauva à la faveur de la nuit, et du mauvais temps qui était épouvantable. On tira sur lui sans l'attraper. Le 25, le temps continua d'être mauvais. Ce qui nous incommoda autant que nos ennemis» [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .

Les Français prennent et attachent des centaines de Natchez. «La femme du grand chef et sa famille sortirent, avec quatre cents cinquante femmes et enfants et quarante cinq hommes, qui ne venaient que peu à peu, de sorte qu'avant que nous les eussions tous mis en sûreté, la journée se passa, qu'il restait encore une vingtaine de personnes dans le fort, qui demandaient qu'on les y laissât jusqu'au lendemain. Je fus forcé de leur accorder leur demande, parce qu'il ne faisait pas un temps à les aller prendre. Nous étions entre deux eaux. Le temps ne s'éleva que vers les neuf heures du soir [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .

Fuite des guerriers Natchez [ modifier | modifier le code ]

À huit heures, ceux qui restaient dans le fort, partirent au nombre de seize hommes et quatre femmes. Le poste des habitants s'en aperçut, mais il leur fut impossible de tirer un seul coup de fusil dessus, non plus qu'à nous de faire marcher nos sauvages» [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] . Ainsi s'échappent les guerriers Natchez, à cheval. «Il est vrai que la pluie tombait par seaux depuis deux jours. Je fis entrer dans le fort, où l'on trouva deux hommes et une femme». Mais le lendemain matin, Perier l'Aîné lance ses alliés Chactas à la poursuite des évadés. Ils abattent puis scalpent un Natchez à cheval et en attrapent deux autres qu'ils brûlent vifs, châtiment que Perier avait imposé aux Natchez qui ne profiteraient pas du temps de grâce [ 9 ] , [ 7 ] . «Le lendemain, nos sauvages prirent deux hommes qu'ils brûlèrent, et ils enlevèrent la chevelure d'un, qu'ils avaient tué» [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .

Destruction du village [ modifier | modifier le code ]

«Le 26 et le 27, je fis travailler à démolir le fort et brûler les bois qui le composaient. Je renvoyai mon frère au camp du bord de l'eau avec le bataillon de la marine et deux cents cinquante esclaves». Les biens des Natchez sont pillés [ 5 ] .

«Le 28, tout étant brûlé, tant fort et maisons que pirogues, je fus joindre mon frère, et le 29, nous partîmes tous pour nous rendre dans le fleuve, où chacun avait besoin de repos, pour se remettre des fatigues qu'il avait essuyées. Si l'on n'avait pas pressé l'ennemi si vivement que nous l'avons fait, nous eussions perdu la moitié de nos forces, tout le monde étant excédé. On ne peut trop louer ceux qui ont servi dans cette expédition. Chacun, à l'envi l'un de l'autre, a voulu se signaler par la valeur et le travail. L'officier y a partout donné l'exemple et la main à tout ce qui était nécessaire pour terminer promptement et heureusement cette expédition» [ 3 ] , [ 4 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .

Retour à La Nouvelle-Orléans et vente des Natchez [ modifier | modifier le code ]

Perier redescend au fleuve et là, les Natchez sont dispersés sur les bateaux, enchaînés par deux. Victorieux, Perier revient à La Nouvelle Orléans où il fait aussitôt incarcérer les Natchez. Parmi eux, on compte seulement 35 hommes en état des porter des armes. Après quelque temps passé aux cachots, les Natchez et leurs deux chefs sont embarqués à destination de Haïti. Mais durant le trajet sur la Gironde, un groupe de Natchez se révolte  il est massacré par l'équipage. Les autres, à bord de la Vénus, sont décimés par la maladie [ 10 ] . Ainsi, seulement 160 Natchez sur environ 500, dont les deux Soleils, parviennent à Haïti où ils sont vendus comme esclaves [ 7 ] , [ 5 ] , [ 1 ] .


Watch the video: Moto camping and the Sunken Trace (January 2022).