Information

Production begins on “Toy Story”


On January 19, 1993, production begins on Toy Story, the first full-length feature film created by the pioneering Pixar Animation Studios. Originally a branch of the filmmaker George Lucas’s visual effects company, Industrial Light and Magic (ILM), Pixar first put itself on the map with special effects produced for films such as Young Sherlock Holmes (1985), which featured the first fully three-dimensional digital or computer-generated image (CGI). In 1986, Pixar became an independent company after it was purchased by Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple Computer.

The fledgling company’s inaugural product was the Pixar Image Computer, which the former Disney animator John Lasseter soon used to produce an animated short film, Luxo Jr. The film won Best Animated Short at the 1986 Academy Awards, raising Pixar’s profile considerably. Lasseter won another Oscar in 1989 for Tin Toy, an animated short featuring a mechanical drummer named Tinny maneuvering around in a baby’s playroom. (Tinny later became the basis for Buzz Lightyear, the spaceman toy who was one of Toy Story’s main characters.)

In 1991, based on the success of Pixar’s short films, the company signed a $26 million deal with the Walt Disney Company to develop, produce and distribute up to three animated feature films. The Little Mermaid (1989) had become Disney’s most successful film to date, and the company was ready to take more chances on innovative animation techniques. Approached by Lasseter about a possible Christmas program, Disney’s chief of film production, Jeffrey Katzenberg, instead responded with the three-picture deal.

Toy Story was the first Pixar-Disney collaboration, and the first feature-length animated film that was completely computer generated. Its plot revolved around the rivalry between the cowboy Woody, previously the favorite toy of a little boy named Andy, and Buzz Lightyear, a shiny new astronaut toy that Andy receives for a birthday present. Multiple Oscar-winner Tom Hanks lent his famous voice to Woody, while Tim Allen of TV’s Home Improvement was Buzz. Though Pixar’s long development process included drawings, paintings, sculptures and photographs, the final work for the film was all done on computers. The sophisticated animation created a vivid three-dimensional world full of color and movement, where toys–including such childhood classics as toy soldiers, Mr. Potato Head and Etch-a-Sketch–come to life.

Released in November 1995, Toy Story received universally positive reviews, and would eventually gross more than $192 million at the domestic box office and $358 million worldwide. Lasseter received a special Academy Award for leading the Pixar team, and the movie became the first animated feature ever to score an Oscar nomination for Best Original Screenplay. There have been three sequels, all of them critically-acclaimed: Toy Story 2 (1999), Toy Story 3 (2010) and Toy Story 4 (2019).


Pixar tells story behind 'Toy Story'

When Hollywood was churning out movies full of explosions and mindless violence a few years ago, Pixar Animation Studios swam against the stream with "Finding Nemo," a G-rated feature that received four Academy Award nominations and grossed more than $355 million.

Today, of course, Pixar's filmmaking wisdom is self-evident. Mention the animation studio and everyone nods wisely.

But Monday, as Pixar celebrated the 10th anniversary of "Toy Story," its debut film, the creative minds behind the studio for the first time told the real story of how they almost lost the picture. Not only did the big-money folks at Disney who bankrolled the film not understand the vision of "Toy Story," they hated it so much they shut down production.

Of course, Pixar made the movie, the movie made millions and Disney watched itself dethroned as the king of animation by a company that Steve Jobs started in a Richmond garage.

It is an instructive story on several levels. Pixar, as you have probably heard, has had a stormy relationship with Disney -- and Disney, at this point, looks like the loser. In the 10 years since we met Woody the cowboy, Buzz Lightyear and the rest of the "Toy Story" gang, Pixar has won 16 Academy Awards and grossed over $3 billion.

Disney, once the gold standard of animation, is reeling from flops like "Treasure Planet."

Is Pixar the new model for corporate filmmaking? Wouldn't that be nice?

Yesterday's press tour was a rare opportunity to cruise the Emeryville campus, where studio guru John Lasseter can be seen strolling by in one of his trademark Hawaiian shirts, and slacker-chic employees zip the halls on scooters when they aren't playing video games and foosball.

Call it the house that Woody built.

"I don't think there is any other studio out there like Pixar," said Lee Unkrich, the co-director of "Finding Nemo," "Monsters, Inc." and "Toy Story 2. "

He's got that right. Where else would employees talk about creating "art as a team sport?"

It isn't just an innovative workplace Pixar sounds a little like an alternative lifestyle.

With their beach garb, geek culture and fanatic attention to detail, the folks at Pixar are churning out the must-see movies of their generation. What no one seems to notice is that, with the huge production costs of computer animation, they are rolling the dice with every new release.

Pixar has only done six feature films in 10 years. But there hasn't been a clunker in the bunch.

"A lot of studios talk about a 12-to-1 ratio -- they come in with 12 ideas and one of them makes it," said Andrew Stanton, who won Oscars for writing and directing "Nemo." "We pick one idea, good or bad, and we stick with it until it works."

That's not how it happens down south, as Pixar discovered with "Toy Story. "

Disney, which was bankrolling the project, peppered the young animators with notes and suggestions. The story was too juvenile, the higher-ups said, and the characters had to be edgier. Afraid to trust themselves, Lasseter and his crew tried to follow all the directions.

It was, nearly everyone agrees, a train wreck. Disney hated the movie and the idea -- and shut it down.

"Yeah that was fun," jokes Pete Docter, who was nominated for Oscars for "Toy Story" and "Monsters, Inc." "And it happened right around Christmas, too."

Lasseter recalls that he "begged" for two weeks to fix things. The animators went back, took out all of Disney's suggestions and made the movie they wanted to make in the first place.

And, naturally, when they screened the new version, Disney execs loved it. There's your corporate minds at work: First they screw it up and hate it, and then don't even realize that they're watching what they hated in the first place.

But if Lasseter's last-second fixes hadn't worked, there would be no

Pixar campus, first in Richmond, and now in Emeryville today, or a potential expansion with building permits available through 2012. Nor would the Bay Area be known as the epicenter of computer animation. It was one of those behind-the-scenes moments that dramatically changes the culture of a community.

And, it has to be said, Pixar has turned out to be a terrific corporate role model. Not only has it been wildly successful, it has turned out films that nearly everyone finds entertaining and worthwhile. The studio's movies, except for some uncharacteristically dark moments in "The Incredibles," are almost always wholesome family fare. The movies, and the studio where they are made, are as down-to-earth and unaffected as the creators.

How do they make it work? Well, a big part of it, they insist, is avoiding what they call "No, but . ."

The idea is that when someone suggests an idea, others should respond with "Yes, and . " not "No, but . ."

Docter and Stanton say that attitude comes from the improv comedy culture, and they credit Joe Ranft (Pixar's 45-year-old head of storytelling until he died last week in a car accident in Mendocino County) with bringing it to Pixar. It all comes with the concept that, as they say on campus, "every idea is a good idea."

"What you need to create," says Stanton, the eighth employee hired when Pixar started 20 years ago, "is the most trusting environment possible where people can screw up."


How Toy Story Changed Movie History

W hen the lights went down for the first screenings of Toy Story across America on Nov. 22, 1995, audiences were merely eager to see how the first fully computer-animated movie had turned out. But the stakes were a bit higher for one particular team of people.

The movie was a joint venture between Disney and Pixar, a young company&mdashthen chaired by Steve Jobs&mdashthat had been recruited by the animation giant for its video capabilities. Pixar had been given a $26 million deal for three computer-animated, feature-length movies, but its filmmakers and engineers had yet to pull off a single one. Neither had anyone else for that matter. Succeeding would mean creating the software and hardware they would need as they went along, and inventing a new kind of movie altogether.

&ldquoAt that point, none of us knew what we were doing. We didn&rsquot have any production expertise except for short films and commercials. So we were all complete novices,&rdquo Ed Catmull, who was then a software engineer and is now Pixar and Disney Animation President, tells TIME. &ldquoBut there was something fresh about nobody knowing what the hell we were doing.&rdquo

Catmull was a member of the Pixar &ldquobrain trust,&rdquo which also included current chief creative officer of Pixar and Disney Animation John Lasseter, the animator selected to direct Toy Story, and screenwriters Andrew Stanton and Pete Docter.

Reflecting on the experience 20 years later, Catmull notes that the young production studio was up against the wall: one project&rsquos failure would likely mean the end of the three-movie contract, and the demise of Pixar studios.

&ldquoThe entire company,&rdquo he says, &ldquowas bet upon us figuring this out.&rdquo

Spoiler alert: it was a good bet. The storytelling and technology of Pixar still rests upon the foundation Toy Story built. By the time the Toy Story credits started rolling that first day, the movies would never be the same.

The Toys

Catmull&rsquos preparation started early. When he was a boy in Utah, he had watched early Disney movies with fascination, his eyes drinking in the color and magic of movement on the screens. All along, he had dreams of illustrating movies himself one day.

&ldquoWe grew up with hand-drawn [animation], done the best at Disney Studios,&rdquo Catmull says. &ldquoIt was very subtle and very emotional.&rdquo

He notes that part of what made the films so magical was how Walt Disney incorporated all the latest technology of his time, letting that innovation stimulate the illustrations. When it came to Toy Story, the animators didn&rsquot have much choice but to follow Disney&rsquos lead. No one had ever tried to make a feature-length film with 3D animation, so the technological capabilities guided much of their creative process, says Lasseter, who worked as an animator at Disney after college.

Catmull and computer scientists at Pixar built the software that animators could use to design the film, like RenderMan, which originated from Catmull&rsquos studies at the University of Utah, and Menv (&ldquomodeling environment&rdquo), which the programmers developed for Pixar&rsquos 1988 short Tin Toy. The goal was to allow the animators, without much engineering background, to control movement and &ldquorig&rdquo their own characters.

In some ways, working with computers opened new possibilities, letting animators add details they never would be able to (or would want to avoid, to minimize illustrators&rsquo &ldquopencil mileage&rdquo), such as the plaid pattern on Woody&rsquos shirt or the stickers on Buzz&rsquos curved glass helmet.

But it had its limits&mdashand that&rsquos where the toys came in.

That software lent itself to perfectly geometric objects, such as blocks, bouncing balls: the type of things found in Andy&rsquos stash of toys. Anything in a more &ldquoorganic&rdquo shape or texture ended up looking plastic&mdashwhich lent itself nicely to a movie about plastic objects springing to life. Toys always hung out in a kid&rsquos room, Lasseter added, which let animators do their illustrations on a perfectly flat floor that was simple to render.

At first, the team was going to avoid humans altogether choosing to keep them just out of the frames, Lady-and-the-Tramp-style, rather than crudely animating their features. Eventually human presence was too hard to avoid, and as a result viewers could put a face to Andy (a face that showed the improvements of Pixar’s rendering capabilities by the time he was off to college in Toy Story 3).

&ldquoI was so geeky and into this stuff,&rdquo Lasseter adds. &ldquoI&rsquod always say &lsquohey can we do this?&rsquo They&rsquod say &lsquono, but let&rsquos try,&rsquo and they&rsquod do R&D to get there. Meanwhile, all that R&D is inspiring different ideas. Then I&rsquod say &lsquooh can we do this with it?&rsquo and come up with ideas we&rsquod never thought of.&rdquo

The Story

That could very well have been the Pixar process, great technology powering their priorities. But even as the Pixar team leaned on the technology&rsquos strengths, they had a cautionary tale from Disney history to keep in mind. Catmull says that he found that after Walt Disney&rsquos death in 1966, the movies suffered when they prioritized art over story. And movies that live and die by technology can often suffer in retrospect, as those state-of-the-art special effects aged.

The problem is that, as Andrew Stanton puts it, &ldquoit&rsquos not a widget you&rsquore making. It&rsquos not a product.&rdquo

Stanton says that once the team received the green light for the movie, they looked back at films that had staying power even after their outdated technology left the &ldquostrings showing,&rdquo such as Snow White, The Wizard of Oz and Star Wars. &ldquoWe said anything that we break ground with, computer graphics-wise, will be subservient to getting the story right,&rdquo he adds, &ldquobecause that&rsquos what history has shown wins.&rdquo

So Stanton set about helping write the screenplay for a buddy movie, where the conversations would bring the characters to life as much as the unprecedented curves and planes. The writing team, which included Joss Whedon and Joel Cohen, paired the character concepts with a more cynical attitude than was typical for animated films, and Pixar also made the decision to skip musical numbers in favor of a more mature feel.

Disney balked at early versions of the story&mdashWoody was not likeable enough, for example&mdashand Catmull says the company “essentially shut down production” over the problem. The future “brain trust” shut themselves in a room to rethink the story. Stanton remembers telling Pete Docter at one point that the two main characters had to be engaging enough that people would think Buzz and Woody stuck in an elevator for 70 minutes was the highest quality of entertainment.

These days, it may sound obvious to say that part of Pixar’s success has been the appeal and emotion of the stories the studio tells&mdashbut 20 years ago, that didn’t necessarily have to be the case. Pixar’s contract with Disney had come as a result of its technological prowess, after all. The decision to put the story first was a key one, and it would power the next two decades of the company’s creativity.

Decades later, Stanton says that the &ldquostrings&rdquo do show, but the measure of the film&rsquos success is that it doesn&rsquot matter: &ldquoIt&rsquos the ugliest picture we will ever make, but you don&rsquot care because you get wrapped up in the story to this day.&rdquo He remains so haunted by how well the movie turned out that he cannot watch the film more than once every two years or so, for fear of losing motivation on his current film projects.

To Infinity&hellip

Children and adults flocked to theaters when Toy Story opened, making it the highest-selling film for three weeks in a row. As the first full-length, 3D computer-animated movie, it was a milestone for animation, possibly the most significant since the introduction of color.

But, many critics glossed over that achievement&mdashwhich is exactly what the developers were hoping for. They were thrilled at the invisibility of the work, Catmull says.

Case in point: &ldquoConsider the new Disney animated feature, John Lasseter’s Toy Story, which is, incidentally, the first full-length film created wholly by computer and, not at all incidentally &mdash by design, in fact &mdash the year’s most inventive comedy,&rdquo Richard Corliss wrote in his Nov. 27 review for TIME that year.

The film won an Academy Award for Special Achievement, as well as nominations for Best Original Screenplay, Score and Song. Jobs told FORTUNE in Sept. 1995 that Pixar and Disney would break even if the movie was a &ldquomodest hit&rdquo at $75 million. It made over $361 million worldwide during its run.

Buzz and Woody&rsquos story continued for two more films, with a fourth set for release in 2018. The foundation Toy Story set had effects far beyond the franchise. Pixar, which Disney acquired in 2006, has released 15 movies since then, accruing 26 Academy Awards and three Grammys in total. As the animators graduated from toys in a flat room to insects, monsters and fish, the studio&rsquos abilities with technology advanced as well. The Incredibles was a milestone as a film based on computer-animated people. In The Good Dinosaur, opening this month, they&rsquoll tackle prehistoric nature.

Lasseter says that for the past 20 years, the priorities established with Toy Story have continued to hold. Every story envisioned by the Pixar team requires something that they don&rsquot know how to do, so they invent the technology that was needed. There have been more than 250 computer-animated films released worldwide since Toy Story. Lasseter attributes that plenitude in part to the choice made by the Toy Story team to worry about story more than showing off, and to concentrate on developing software to serve their ideas rather than the other way around: if Toy Story hadn’t succeeded the way it did, it might not have inspired others to follow.

As for himself, his metric for success doesn&rsquot count animated movies made or Oscars won or tickets sold. It was just five days after the Toy Story premiere, as he changed planes in Dallas, that he knew the gamble had paid off.

&ldquoThere was a little boy with his mom holding a Woody cowboy doll. The look on his face I will never forget. It was the first time I&rsquod seen a character we created in the hands of somebody else,&rdquo he says. &ldquoI think about it every day: that character no longer belonged to me, it belonged to him.&rdquo


A History of Toy Story

Hey guys, it's me again. In light of the new Pixar movie, Toy Story 3, I'm going to take a break from my Disney-related articles and write an article on the production history of Toy Story, Toy Story 2 and Toy Story 3.

In 1988, John Lasseter (co-founder of Pixar and former Walt Disney animator) and Pixar wrote, produced and directed a short film called Tin Toy. This short was about a little toy named Tinny who reluctantly allowed a baby to play with him so he won't cry. This was the fourth Pixar film to be made using only computer animation. It won the 1988 Academy Award for Animated Short Film.


Tinny is reluctant to play with Billy, the destructive baby.

In the 90s, Disney approached John Lasseter to create a sequel to Tin Toy, a Christmas special. Pixar, thinking 6 minutes wasn't enough, asked Disney if they could make it 30 minutes. When President of Walt Disney Studios Peter Schneider heard about this, he suggested they make it full-length instead. Many of the employees at Pixar were surprised. This new movie's working title was Toy Story.

Realizing that Tinny wasn't a well-thought out enough character for Toy Story, John Lasseter changed him to a military-like figure, a space ranger. This character was called Lunar Larry but later his name would be changed to Tempus the Morph and eventually Buzz Lightyear. Lasseter didn't want to do a Disney fairytale with songs, he wanted to do a buddy film. So John Lasseter created a ventriloquist dummy known as Woody. He would later become a stuffed cowboy doll.


The original concept art for Woody

Toy Story was the very first feature-length computer animated film. In this movie, a toy named Woody is scared he'll be replaced by a new space ranger toy, who was delusional and thought he was a real space ranger. Originally, the character called Buzz was fully aware of the fact that he was a toy. Instead of being a military-like space ranger, he was an easy-going and happy toy who only wanted to impress his owner Andy. The songs were written by Randy Newman, who would write the songs for the next two sequels for Toy Story as well. "You've Got a Friend In Me" became a staple in many children's lives.






The evolution of Lunar Larry to Buzz Lightyear

There was only one person Lasseter wanted for Woody and that was Tom Hanks. Originally when showed an example of what Woody looked like, Hanks didn't understand the character. He didn't think it was animation, he thought it was plasticine. He couldn't explain how animation was like in the movie but when he read the script, he knew he had to be involved in the film. Billy Crystal was asked to be Buzz Lightyear but he declined, a decision he would later regret. Tim Allen, fresh from filming Home Improvement, was asked to be Buzz and he accepted. Cheers alumni John Ratzenberg plays a wisecracking piggy bank. John Ratzenberg would later play a character in every single Pixar film, becoming a good-luck charm for them.


Early concept of Woody and Buzz.

When Head of Walt Disney Studios Jeffrey Katzenberg heard about this movie, he wanted more edge to it. He wanted the movie to be more adult-like. As a result, he reworked the character of Woody, making him into a cynical and bitter toy who would berate and insult all the other toys and would stop at nothing for Buzz to be eliminated. As a result, the movie started to suffer. Katzenberg took Peter Schneider aside and asked him why the movie was doing so badly. Peter said the movie 'wasn't their's anymore'. He gave the movie back to Pixar and they made Woody a likable character again. At first, Roy E. Disney couldn't understand the appeal of this movie but after watching the finally cut, he told his wife, "I get this movie".


The original cynical Woody

The movie was an instant hit and many praised this new form of animation. It was an instant classic. Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel both gave it two thumbs up, praising the computer animation and the buddy film storyline. John Lasseter got a Special Achievement Oscar for the film. It was the first in many universally acclaimed Pixar films.

At this point, Pixar had some financial problems. It was in hard times. At the same time, Disney was trying to coax John Lasseter back to their studio to direct a film. Most of this financial problem came from the fact that Pixar didn't get any merchandising profit. Steve Jobs, chief executive of Pixar, knew they couldn't just be a production company, they had to be a studio. Toy Story turned from a $10 million investment into a $100 million profit. Steve Jobs used this money to establish Pixar into a studio. Steve Jobs told Disney that they would only extend their 5 movies contract with Disney if they became 50/50 partners. Disney agreed.

In 1997, a sequel to Toy Story was being created. It was going to be a direct-to-video movie but Disney saw the potential of this movie when looking at the storyboards and decided to release it theatrically. At the time, the story was lackluster, it was failing. Fresh from the European promotional trip of A Bug's Life, John Lasseter looked at the film and he also thought the movie wasn't as good as it should be. Lasseter asked Disney if Pixar could redo the film from scratch, Disney didn't let them, they thought it was good enough. Therefore, Lasseter reworked the film in the next nine months with the original team from Toy Story, pitched the whole movie in a week and co-directed the film with Lee Unkrich, despite the fact he was extremely exhausted from A Bug's Life and hadn't seen his family for months.


Courtesy of Floyd Norman
A new sequel to Toy Story!


What the film was like before John Lasseter's involvement.


Courtesy of Floyd Norman
Courtesy of Floyd Norman
Concept art after John Lasseter's involvment.

This film was another masterpiece. The only Pixar film to score 100% on Rotten Tomatoes, it became one of the very few sequels to have been as good, if not better than their predecessor. The film was animated by Pixar employees but also by long-time Disney employee Floyd Norman. Floyd had worked at Disney since the 50s and he still worked there today. He was one of Walt Disney's closest employees, but I digress. Floyd was a story artist for Toy Story 2 and he helped come up with the concept of Senorita Cactus, who would soon evolve into Jessie the Cowgirl. Jessie the Cowgirl was one of the most important characters because of her past. She was forgotten by her owner Emily after she grew up. Because of this, she wanted Woody to stay with her, Stinky Pete and Bullseye, not wanting Woody to experience the same pain with Andy. The majority of the film were Andy's toys trying to rescue Woody from Stinky Pete, who wants them all to go on display in a museum in Japan. The animators at Pixar thought children weren't going to stay and watch the montage of Jessie's past but it was the highlight of the movie. Even though Tom Hanks and Tim Allen knew everything about the film, when they sat down together and watched the movie, they bawled at the 'cowgirl scene', the most heartwarming part of the film.

Courtesy of Floyd Norman
Floyd Norman jokingly pitches the story with a cane.


Jessie the Cowgirl thinks about Emily.

Toy Story 2 defined who Pixar were. It said that the important thing wasn't the idea, it's the people. Knowing this, Steve Jobs was worried. He was worried that Pixar would divide into company divisions, he knew the people separating was bad. He wanted one roof for all employees so he used his money to create the new animation studio building. Many employees were extremely excited at this new building, like storyboard artist Joe Ranft, may he rest in peace. The new Pixar Animation Studios was built and it represented the imagination inside children, allowing each office to be an empty canvas for the employee to do with however they liked.


John Lasseter in his office at Pixar Animation Studios, filled with oh-so-many toys.

By 2004, Pixar's relationship with Disney had soured over the argument of whether Toy Story 2 was one of the films included in the five-movie contract. Michael Eisner wanted to create another sequel to Toy Story but the people at Pixar refused to cooperate. They knew that if a sequel was to be made, a great story had to be made. They had not come up with a good story at that point. Eisner didn't care, he went ahead and formed a division of Disney called Circle 7, which exclusively made Pixar sequels. Pixar was horrified, they felt that the original creators should carry on the sequels. Ed Catmull, co-founder of Pixar, said that it "was like turning your baby over to someone else".


Promo image for the original Toy Story 3 concept.

Michael Eisner resigned in 2005 and Circle 7 had died out. New CEO of Disney Bob Iger purchased Pixar in 2006 and John Lasseter became the new Chief Creative Officer of Disney. Because of this newly-improved relations, plans for Toy Story 3 were underway. When Eisner was in charge, the film was to be about Buzz Lightyear malfunctioning and all the Buzz Lightyear toys being recalled to Taiwan and the rest of Andy's toys went there to rescue him. Tim Allen was interesting in returning to voice Buzz even though Pixar wasn't involved. After the purchase of Disney, the film completely changed. It was written by Pixar employees Andrew Stanton (also director of Finding Nemo) and Michael Arndt. All the original voice cast from the first two films came back for this film, with the exception of Jim Varney (Ernest P. Worrell) who had died of lung cancer in 2000. He was replaced by Blake Clark, a very good friend of Jim's and who sounded exactly like Jim Varney. This new version was about Andy turning 17 and having to go to college and the toys going to a daycare center ruled by a dictatorial teddy bear. The toys try to escape in the manner of The Great Escape and reunite with their owner who hadn't played with them for years. This film was to be an end to the Toy Story saga and it allowed people who watched the first Toy Story as children to reunite with their childhood one last time before growing up with Andy. A great ending to a great saga, this film was the ultimate nostalgia for many people in the theater the day it came out.


Concept art of the Sunnyside Daycare toys.


Concept art of Lots-O'-Huggin-Bear confronting Woody.


Courtesy of @leeunkrich at Twitter
Tom Hanks records the part of Woody with director Lee Unkrich.


Courtesy of @leeunkrich at Twitter
Pixar's good-luck charm, John Ratzenberg reprises his role as Hamm.


Courtesy of @leeunkrich at Twitter
Randy Newman records the score and songs for Toy Story 3.


Courtesy of @leeunkrich at Twitter
"C'mon, we're bustin' outta here!"


Courtesy of @leeunkrich at Twitter
Director Lee Unkrich puts the final touches on Toy Story 3 in an airplane.


Concept art of Woody's good-bye.

Fortunately, a Toy Story short will be released in front of the Cars sequel, Cars 2 so the saga had not necessarily ended yet. We will see Woody and the gang one last time before we depart them for good. Until then, we have all our fond memories of playing with our toys as children. I'm sure many of us went home to play with our dusty toys after watching Toy Story 3. I'm sure many of us cried as well. All three Toy Story movies were truly great movies and they represented the essence of Pixar and its ideals the best. We will all fondly look back on these days with a smile and in the corner of our eye, we may even catch a glimpse of one of our toys moving.



Reach for the sky, guys.


16-20 Interesting Facts About Toy Story

16. Originally the main character was going to be Tinny, the title character in Tin Toy (1988). He would have gotten lost during a family trip and joined up with a sarcastic ventriloquist dummy in a search for a home. Eventually, Tinny was replaced with a toy astronaut named Lunar Larry, which then became Buzz Lightyear. The dummy, meanwhile, was given the identity of a cowboy, eventually becoming Woody.

17. When the Pizza Planet delivery boy enters the Dinoco gas station, he asks for directions to West Cutting Boulevard. West Cutting Boulevard is the street where Pixar Animation Studios was located in Richmond, California, at the time (Pixar moved its entire operation to Emeryville, California, in 2000).

18. When the soldiers are watching the pile of presents disappear during the birthday party, two silhouette pictures can be seen on the wall. These pictures are available at Walt Disney parks worldwide, and are cut freehand, with no prior sketchwork, using nothing but paper and scissors by the park’s employees.

19. All of the cars in Toy Story have license plate stickers that are dated November 95, the same date the movie was released.

20. Some 3D effects were too complex, or even impossible, to calculate at the time of this film subtle tricks are used to avoid them. Examples: explosions, thus the viewer doesn’t see Combat Carl’s demise hair dynamics, so Andy, Sid, and Molly all have short hair while Andy’s mother’s hair is always tied back in a simple-to-model pony tail and flying water droplets, thus the viewer doesn’t see any liquid when Woody dumps his burning head into a bowl of cereal.


Toy Story (video)

Standard Release Also on DTS Laserdisc has the Walt Disney Masterpiece Collection logo with 1992 Walt Disney Classics Music on a Toy Story 1997 Laserdisc.

    Laserdisc Trailer: Tex
  • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, Ralph Eggleston, William Reeves, Ralph Guggenheim and Bonnie Arnold (Only extra on Sides 1-3)
  • Side Four (Early Pixar Computer Animation)
    • The Adventures of André and Wally B.
    • Luxo Jr.
    • Red's Dream
    • Tin Toy
    • Knick Knack
    • Side Five
      • "The Story Behind Disney's Toy Story" (27-minute version)
      • Trailers and TV Spots
      • Multi-Language Reel
      • Buzz Lightyear commercial
      • Supplemental Audio
        • I Will Go Sailing No More
        • Strange Things
        • You've Got a Friend in Me
        • Plastic Spaceman Version 1
        • Plastic Spaceman Version 2
        • The Fool
        • Development and History of the Production of Toy Story
        • Original Treatments for Toy Story
        • Early Animation Tests
        • Character Design and Modeling (with Introduction)
        • Miscellaneous Toys and Molly
        • Side Seven
          • Editing and Story Reels: Woody Meets Buzz/Buzz Flies
          • Storyboard to Film Comparison: The Chase
          • Abandoned Concepts
            • Buzz Lightyear Cartoon
            • Western Shootout
            • Woody's Nightmare
            • Eastern Gate
            • Shakes the Rattle
            • Sid's Comeuppance
            • The Chase
            • Environment Design

            "Ultimate Toy Box Collector's Edition" Release

            • Tin Toy
            • "The Story Behind Toy Story" (27-minute version)
            • Multi-Language Reel
            • "Character Interviews"
            • Toy Story Treats
            • "Buzz Lightyear commercial" Trailer: Tex (Mastered and Duplicated Variant)

            Special Audio Features:

            • Dolby Digital 5.1: Soundtrack
            • Dolby Digital 5.1: Sound Effects Only
            • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, Ralph Eggleston, William Reeves, Ralph Guggenheim and Bonnie Arnold

            Ultimate Toy Box Bonus Disc

            • History
              • "History and Development"
              • "Early Test"
              • Original Treatments (with Introduction)
                • March 1991 Treatment
                • September 1991 Treatment
                • "Green Army Men Storyboard Pitch" (with Introduction)
                • Editing
                • "Story Reel: Andy's New Toy"
                • "Storyboard to Film Comparison: The Chase"
                • Abandoned Concepts (with Introduction)
                  • Buzz Lightyear Cartoon
                  • Western Shootout
                  • Woody's Nightmare
                  • Eastern Gate
                  • Shakes the Rattle
                  • Sid's Comeuppance
                  • The Chase
                  • The Characters (with Introduction)
                      • Design
                        • Character Design
                        • Early Model
                        • Model Pack
                        • Final Maquette
                        • Design
                          • Character Design
                          • Model Pack
                          • Model Construction
                          • Digitizing Maquette
                          • Insignia Design
                          • Decals
                          • Merchandise Design
                          • "Designing Scud"
                          • Design
                          • Animation Tests (with Commentary by Glenn McQueen)
                          • "Designing Color" (labeled here as "Designing Toy Story")
                          • Concept Art
                          • Color Scripts
                          • Color Keys
                          • "Production Tour"
                          • "Layout Tricks"
                          • "Animation Tour"
                          • "Character Animation"
                          • Shaders and Lighting (with Introduction)
                            • Shaders
                            • Lighting
                            • Motion Blur and Reflections
                            • Rain Effects (with Introduction)
                              • Rain Reference Footage
                              • Moving "Bump-Man" Pattern
                              • Rain Effects on Windows
                              • Rain Shadow Effects
                              • Final Scene
                              • Smoke Trajectory
                              • "Primitives" Guide
                              • Final Scene
                              • Sound Design
                              • Randy Newman Demos
                                  Biography
                              • I Will Go Sailing No More
                              • Strange Things
                              • You've Got a Friend in Me
                              • Plastic Spaceman Version 1
                              • Plastic Spaceman Version 2
                              • The Fool
                                • Torture
                                • Rain
                                • Render Bugs
                                • Trailers
                                  • Original Teaser Trailer
                                  • Original Theatrical Trailer

                                  Original Release (Version 2)

                                  10th Anniversary Edition Release

                                  • Introduction by John Lasseter
                                  • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, Ralph Eggleston, William Reeves, Ralph Guggenheim and Bonnie Arnold
                                  • "The Legacy of Toy Story" Trailer: Tex 2: Moo Can (Lucasfilm Ltd. variant)
                                  • English Dolby Digital 5.1 EX
                                  • English 5.1 ES
                                  • English Dolby Digital 2.0
                                  • French Dolby Digital 2.0
                                  • Spanish Dolby Digital 2.0
                                  • "Making Toy Story"
                                  • "Filmmakers Reflect"
                                  • Deleted Scenes
                                    • Torture
                                    • Rain
                                    • Buzz Lightyear Cartoon
                                    • Western Shootout
                                    • Woody's Nightmare
                                    • Eastern Gate
                                    • Shakes the Rattle
                                    • Sid's Comeuppance
                                    • "Designing Toy Story"
                                    • Design
                                    • Andy's Toys
                                    • Miscellaneous Toys
                                    • Andy's Family
                                    • Sid's Family
                                    • 3-D Turnarounds
                                      • Woody
                                      • Buzz
                                      • Andy's Toys
                                      • Alien
                                      • Andy's Room
                                      • Gas Station
                                      • Sid's Room
                                      • "Designing Color"
                                      • "Concept Art"
                                      • "Color Scripts"
                                      • "Green Army Men Pitch"
                                      • "Andy's New Toy"
                                      • Storyboard to Film Comparison
                                      • "Production Tour"
                                      • Production Progression Demonstration: The Chase
                                      • "Layout Tricks"
                                      • "Animation Tour"
                                      • "Multi-Language Reel"
                                      • You've Got a Friend in Me
                                      • "Designing Sound"
                                      • Randy Newman Demos
                                        • I Will Go Sailing No More
                                        • Strange Things
                                        • You've Got a Friend in Me
                                        • Plastic Spaceman Version 1
                                        • Plastic Spaceman Version 2
                                        • The Fool
                                        • "Character Interview"
                                        • Original Theatrical Teaser
                                        • Original Theatrical Trailer
                                        • 4 TV Spots
                                        • "Posters"
                                        • "Toys and Stuff"
                                        • Toy Story Treats

                                        • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, Ralph Eggleston, William Reeves, Ralph Guggenheim and Bonnie Arnold
                                        • "Toy Story 3 Sneak Peek: The Story"
                                        • "Buzz Lightyear Mission Logs: Blast Off"
                                        • Paths to Pixar: Artists
                                        • Studio Stories
                                          • "John's Car"
                                          • "Baby AJ"
                                          • "Scooter Races"

                                          Blu-ray

                                          "Special Edition" Release Bonus Features:

                                          • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Ralph Guggenheim, Bonnie Arnold, Andrew Stanton, William Reeves, Pete Docter & Ralph Eggleston
                                          • "Toy Story 3 Sneak Peek: The Story"
                                          • "Buzz Lightyear Mission Logs: Blast Off"
                                          • Paths to Pixar: Artists
                                          • Studio Stories
                                            • "John's Car"
                                            • "Baby AJ"
                                            • "Scooter Races"
                                            • "Filmmakers Reflect"
                                            • "Making Toy Story"
                                            • "The Legacy of Toy Story"
                                            • "Designing Toy Story"
                                            • Deleted Scenes
                                              • Torture
                                              • Rain
                                              • Buzz Lightyear Cartoon
                                              • Western Shootout
                                              • Woody's Nightmare
                                              • Eastern Gate
                                              • Shakes the Rattle
                                              • Sid's Comeuppance
                                              • Woody
                                              • Buzz
                                              • Andy's Toys
                                              • Alien
                                              • Andy's Room
                                              • Gas Station
                                              • Sid's Room
                                              • "Designing Color"
                                              • "Concept Art"
                                              • "Color Scripts"
                                              • "Green Army Men Pitch"
                                              • "Andy's New Toy"
                                              • Storyboard to Film Comparison
                                              • "Production Tour"
                                              • "Layout Tricks"
                                              • "Animation Tour"
                                              • "Multi-Language Reel"
                                              • You've Got a Friend in Me Music Video by Randy Newman
                                              • "Designing Sound"
                                              • Randy Newman Demos
                                                • I Will Go Sailing No More
                                                • Strange Things
                                                • You've Got a Friend in Me
                                                • Plastic Spaceman Version 1
                                                • Plastic Spaceman Version 2
                                                • The Fool
                                                • "Character Interview"
                                                • Original Theatrical Teaser
                                                • Original Theatrical Trailer
                                                • 4 TV Spots
                                                • "Posters"
                                                • "Toys and Stuff"
                                                • Toy Story Treats

                                                Standard Re-release Bonus Features:

                                                • Audio Commentary by John Lasseter, Ralph Guggenheim, Bonnie Arnold, Andrew Stanton, William Reeves, Pete Docter & Ralph Eggleston
                                                • "Toy Story 3 Sneak Peek: The Story"
                                                • "Buzz Lightyear Mission Logs: Blast Off"
                                                • Paths to Pixar: Artists
                                                • Studio Stories
                                                  • "John's Car"
                                                  • "Baby AJ"
                                                  • "Scooter Races"
                                                  • "Filmmakers Reflect"
                                                  • "Making Toy Story"
                                                  • "The Legacy of Toy Story"
                                                  • "Designing Toy Story"
                                                  • Deleted Scenes
                                                    • Torture
                                                    • Rain
                                                    • Buzz Lightyear Cartoon
                                                    • Western Shootout
                                                    • Woody's Nightmare
                                                    • Eastern Gate
                                                    • Shakes the Rattle
                                                    • Sid's Comeuppance
                                                    • Woody
                                                    • Buzz
                                                    • Andy's Toys
                                                    • Alien
                                                    • Andy's Room
                                                    • Gas Station
                                                    • Sid's Room
                                                    • "Designing Color"
                                                    • "Concept Art"
                                                    • "Color Scripts"
                                                    • "Green Army Men Pitch"
                                                    • "Andy's New Toy"
                                                    • Storyboard to Film Comparison
                                                    • "Production Tour"
                                                    • "Layout Tricks"
                                                    • "Animation Tour"
                                                    • "Multi-Language Reel"
                                                    • You've Got a Friend in Me Music Video by Randy Newman
                                                    • "Designing Sound"
                                                    • Randy Newman Demos
                                                      • I Will Go Sailing No More
                                                      • Strange Things
                                                      • You've Got a Friend in Me
                                                      • Plastic Spaceman Version 1
                                                      • Plastic Spaceman Version 2
                                                      • The Fool
                                                      • "Character Interview"
                                                      • Original Theatrical Teaser
                                                      • Original Theatrical Trailer
                                                      • 4 TV Spots
                                                      • "Posters"
                                                      • "Toys and Stuff"
                                                      • Toy Story Treats

                                                      4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray "Ultimate Collector's Edition" Re-release


                                                      &lsquoToy Story&rsquo finds a home

                                                      The heart of downtown Point Richmond was a block away from the office park, and the growing &ldquoToy Story&rdquo team would congregate there for lunch, dinner and just to clear their heads. Two survivors are the Richmond Plunge swimming pool and Little Louie&rsquos deli, with a menu that&rsquos identical 25 years later, including the jalapeño-infused &ldquoturbo tuna&rdquo and &ldquoturbo turkey.&rdquo

                                                      Eggleston: I lived in Marina Bay (in Richmond). Point Richmond had a lot of little funky cool restaurants. Hidden City Cafe, which is closed now. &ldquoHidden City&rdquo was the code name for the early version of our movie &ldquoMonster&rsquos Inc.&rdquo That was because we loved going there. That was our lunch and dinner. We didn&rsquot have a cafeteria at Pixar.

                                                      Sarafian: We would go up in the hills and pick blackberries in the summer, and all come back and make blackberry pies for lunch. It was a small number of people. And we all did things together.

                                                      Little Louie’s Cafe and Deli was a popular lunch spot for Pixar staff in Point Richmond.

                                                      (Marissa Leshnov / Special To The Chronicle | San Francisco Chronicle)

                                                      Kratter: It had a little deli, a cute little restaurant, a tiny library. Little Louie&rsquos, Hidden City Cafe. The train tracks were maybe 20 feet from our building so the entire building would shake when a train would go by. It was still a really small town feel even though we were just miles from San Francisco.

                                                      Reeves: I remember that the train tracks went right by my office. They thundered by. I really liked that place. It was conducive to sort of the state we were in of &ldquostart small and show what you can do.&rdquo It just felt good.

                                                      Sarafian: To this day, whenever things are going south, Jonas Rivera and I will joke, &ldquoShould we run out and get a turbo tuna for everybody?&rdquo

                                                      “Toy Story” producer Bonnie Arnold poses for a portrait in Los Angeles.

                                                      (Kendrick Brinson / Special To The Chronicle | San Francisco Chronicle)


                                                      Pixar Animation Studios

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                                                      Pixar Animation Studios, motion-picture studio, from 2006 a wholly owned subsidiary of the Disney Company, that was instrumental in the development and production of computer-animated films in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Pixar’s feature-length releases, which consistently achieved worldwide commercial success, were lauded not only for their visual innovations but for their intelligent and emotional storytelling. Its headquarters are located in Emeryville, California.

                                                      Pixar originated in the 1970s at the New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), where a team of computer scientists, including Ed Catmull, contributed to the emerging field of computer graphics. In 1979 Catmull was hired by Lucasfilm Ltd., the California-based production company of filmmaker George Lucas, to lead its nascent computer division, and several of his NYIT colleagues followed him there. Aiming to improve graphics technology, the division developed the Pixar Image Computer, which, in its ability to render high-resolution three-dimensional colour images, offered applications beyond the film industry. (The name “Pixar” was conceived as a faux-Spanish word meaning “to make pictures.”) By 1984 Lucasfilm had hired John Lasseter, who had worked as an animator at Disney, and he took advantage of the company’s technological strides to create short computer-animated films.

                                                      With Lucas seeking to streamline his company, the computer division in 1986 was spun off as an independent business, the controlling interest of which was acquired by Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, then the head of the computer firm NeXT Inc. Catmull became president and CEO of the new company, called Pixar, and Jobs was installed as chairman of the board. Initially, Jobs steered the company’s efforts toward marketing the Pixar Image Computer and developing high-tech graphics software. Pixar was slow to turn a profit, however, and in 1990 it sold its hardware operations. Also that year it moved from San Rafael, California, to nearby Point Richmond.

                                                      Meanwhile, Lasseter’s short films, produced with the company’s own cutting-edge software, won some acclaim, including an Academy Award for Tin Toy (1988). In 1989 Pixar began making computer-animated television commercials, and two years later it entered into an agreement with Disney to jointly develop, produce, and distribute three feature-length animated motion pictures. Reorganizing to accommodate its new creative focus, Pixar spent much of the next several years working on Toy Story, which opened in theatres in 1995 as the first entirely computer-animated feature film. The family-friendly movie, which humorously imagined the private lives of toys, was a critical and commercial hit, and it earned Lasseter, its director, an Academy Award for special achievement.

                                                      By 1995 Jobs had taken a more active role in the company as its CEO. (Catmull remained an upper-level executive.) One week after Toy Story’s release, Pixar launched its initial public stock offering. In 1997, having amassed substantial revenues from the film and its merchandising, the studio negotiated to extend its partnership with Disney. While expanding its operations (it moved to its Emeryville headquarters in 2000), Pixar enjoyed continued success with such crowd-pleasing movies as A Bug’s Life (1998), Toy Story 2 (1999), Finding Nemo (2003), and The Incredibles (2004).

                                                      In 2006, as the Disney contract neared its end, Jobs sold Pixar to the larger company. Catmull was named president of both Walt Disney Animation Studios and Pixar Animation Studios, while Lasseter became the studios’ chief creative officer. He left his position in 2018 amid allegations of sexual misconduct. Subsequent Pixar productions included WALL∙E (2008) Brave (2012) Monsters University (2013), a sequel to the studio’s Monsters, Inc. (2001) Inside Out (2015) Finding Dory (2016), a sequel to Finding Nemo Coco (2017) Incredibles 2 (2018) and Toy Story 4 (2019). During the first decade in which the Academy Award for best animated feature film was bestowed (beginning in 2002), Pixar productions dominated the category, capturing eight nominations and six wins. Up (2009) and Toy Story 3 (2010) also received Oscar nominations for best picture—a rare honour for animated fare.


                                                      Disney History

                                                      Walt Disney arrived in California in the summer of 1923 with a lot of hopes but little else. He had made a cartoon in Kansas City about a little girl in a cartoon world, called Alice’s Wonderland, and he decided that he could use it as his “pilot” film to sell a series of these “Alice Comedies” to a distributor. Soon after arriving in California, he was successful. A distributor in New York, M. J. Winkler, contracted to distribute the Alice Comedies on October 16, 1923, and this date became the start of the Disney company. Originally known as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, with Walt Disney and his brother, Roy, as equal partners, the company soon changed its name, at Roy’s suggestion, to the Walt Disney Studio.

                                                      Walt Disney made his Alice Comedies for four years, but in 1927, he decided to move instead to an all-cartoon series. To star in this new series, he created a character named Oswald the Lucky Rabbit. Within a year, Walt made 26 of these Oswald cartoons, but when he tried to get some additional money from his distributor for a second year of the cartoons, he found out that the distributor had gone behind his back and signed up almost all of his animators, hoping to make the Oswald cartoons in his own studio for less money without Walt Disney. On rereading his contract, Walt realized that he did not own the rights to Oswald—the distributor did. It was a painful lesson for the young cartoon producer to learn. From then on, he saw to it that he owned everything that he made.

                                                      The original Disney Studio had been in the back half of a real estate office on Kingswell Avenue in Hollywood, but soon Walt had enough money to move next door and rent a whole store for his studio. That small studio was sufficient for a couple of years, but the company eventually outgrew it, and Walt had to look elsewhere. He found an ideal piece of property on Hyperion Avenue in Hollywood, built a studio, and in 1926, moved his staff to the new facility.

                                                      It was at the Hyperion Studio, after the loss of Oswald, that Walt had to come up with a new character, and that character was Mickey Mouse. With his chief animator, Ub Iwerks, Walt designed the famous mouse and gave him a personality that endeared him to all. Ub animated two Mickey Mouse cartoons, but Walt was unable to sell them because they were silent films, and sound was revolutionizing the movie industry. So, they made a third Mickey Mouse cartoon, this time with fully synchronized sound, and Steamboat Willie opened to rave reviews at the Colony Theater in New York November 18, 1928. A cartoon star, Mickey Mouse, was born. The new character was immediately popular, and, a lengthy series of Mickey Mouse cartoons followed.

                                                      Not one to rest on his laurels, Walt Disney soon produced another series—the Silly Symphonies—to go with the Mickey series. It featured different casts of characters in each film and enabled animators to experiment with stories that relied less on the gags and quick humor of the Mickey cartoons and more on mood, emotion, and musical themes. Eventually the Silly Symphonies turned into the training ground for all Disney artists as they prepared for the advent of animated feature films. Flowers and Trees, a Silly Symphony and the first full-color cartoon, won the Academy Award ® for Best Cartoon for 1932, the first year that the Academy offered such a category. For the rest of that decade, a Disney cartoon won the Oscar ® every year.

                                                      While the cartoons were gaining popularity in movie houses, the Disney staff found that merchandising the characters was an additional source of revenue. A man in New York offered Walt $300 for the license to put Mickey Mouse on some pencil tablets he was manufacturing. Walt Disney needed the $300, so he said okay. That was the start of Disney merchandising. Soon there were Mickey Mouse dolls, dishes, toothbrushes, radios, figurines—almost everything you could think of bore Mickey’s likeness. The year 1930 was a big one for the mouse that started it all, as it saw the first Mickey Mouse book and newspaper comic strip published.

                                                      One night in 1934, Walt informed his animators that they were going to make an animated feature film, and then he told them the story of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. There were some skeptics in the group, but before long everyone had caught Walt’s enthusiasm, and work began in earnest. It took three years, but the landmark film debuted on December 21, 1937 and became a spectacular hit. Snow White soon became the highest-grossing film of all time, a record it held until it was surpassed by Gone with the Wind. Now Walt Disney’s studio had firmer footing. The short cartoons paid the bills, but Walt knew that future profits would come from feature films.

                                                      Work immediately began on other feature projects, but just as things were looking rosy, along came World War II. The next two features, Pinocchio and Fantasia, were released in 1940. They were technical masterpieces, but their costs were too high for a company losing most of its foreign markets because of the war. Dumbo was made in 1941 on a very limited budget, but Bambi, in 1942, was another expensive film, and caused the studio to retrench. It would be many years before animated features of the highest caliber could be put into production.

                                                      During the war, Walt made two films in South America, Saludos Amigos and The Three Caballeros, at the request of the State Department. His studio concentrated on making propaganda and training films for the military. When the war ended, it was difficult for the Disney Studio to regain its pre-war footing. Several years went by with the release of “package” features—films such as Make Mine Music and Melody Time, containing groups of short cartoons packaged together. Walt also moved into live-action production with films such as So Dear to My Heart, but because audiences expected animation from Walt Disney, these films included animated segments. Walt opened some new doors by beginning the award-winning True-Life Adventure series featuring nature photography of a style never seen before.

                                                      The year 1950 saw big successes at Disney—the first completely live-action film, Treasure Island, the return to classic animated features with Cinderella, and the first Disney television show at Christmas time. The Company was moving forward again. After two Christmas specials, Walt Disney went onto television in a big way in 1954 with the beginning of the Disneyland anthology series. This series eventually would run on all three networks and go through six title changes, but it remained on the air for 29 years, making it the longest-running primetime television series ever. The Mickey Mouse Club, one of television’s most popular children’s series, debuted in 1955 and made stars of a group of talented Mouseketeers.

                                                      Walt was never satisfied with what he had already accomplished. As his motion pictures and television programs became successful, he felt a desire to branch out. One area that intrigued him was amusement parks. As a father, he had taken his two young daughters to zoos, carnivals, and other entertainment enterprises, but he always ended up sitting on the bench as they rode the merry-go-round and had all the fun. He felt that there should be a park where parents and children could go and have a good time together. This was the genesis of Disneyland. After several years of planning and construction, the new park opened on July 17, 1955.

                                                      Disneyland was a totally new kind of park. Observers coined the term “theme park,” but even that does not seem to do Disneyland justice. It has been used as a pattern for every amusement park built since its opening, becoming internationally famous and attracting hundreds of millions of visitors. Walt said that Disneyland would never be completed as long as there was imagination left in the world, and that statement remains true today. New attractions are added regularly, and Disneyland is even more popular now than it was in 1955.

                                                      The 1950s saw the release of the classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, The Shaggy Dog—first in a series of wacky comedies—and a popular TV series about the legendary hero Zorro. In the 1960s came Audio-Animatronics® technology, pioneered with Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room at Disneyland and then four shows at the 1964 New York World’s Fair, and Mary Poppins—perhaps the culmination of all Walt Disney had learned during his long movie-making career. But the ’60s also brought the end of an era: Walt Disney died December 15, 1966.

                                                      Plans that Walt left behind carried the Company for a number of years under the supervision of Roy Disney. The Jungle Book in 1967 and The Aristocats in 1970 showed that the Company could still make animated classics, and The Love Bug in 1969 was the highest-grossing film of the year. Disney began work on educational films and materials in a big way with the start of an educational subsidiary in 1969.

                                                      After the success of Disneyland, it was only natural for Walt to consider another park on the East Coast. Prior to his death, the Company purchased land in Florida, and the Walt Disney World project, located on some 28,000 acres near Orlando, was announced. It opened October 1, 1971. In Florida, the Company had the space it lacked in California. Finally there was room to create a destination resort, unencumbered by the urban sprawl that had grown up around Disneyland. Walt Disney World would include not only a Magic Kingdom theme park like Disneyland but also hotels, campgrounds, golf courses, and shopping villages. It did not take long for Walt Disney World to become the premier vacation destination in the world.

                                                      Roy O. Disney, who after Walt’s death oversaw the building and financing of Walt Disney World, died in late 1971, and for the next decade the Company was led by a team including Card Walker, Donn Tatum, and Ron Miller—all originally trained by the Disney brothers. One of Walt’s last plans had been for the Experimental Prototype Community of Tomorrow, or EPCOT, as he called it. While he died before the plans could be refined, they were brought out again in a few years, and in 1979 ground was broken for the new park in Florida. EPCOT Center, a combination of Future World and World Showcase representing an investment of more than a billion dollars, opened to great acclaim October 1, 1982.

                                                      WED Enterprises (later renamed Walt Disney Imagineering), the design and development division for the parks, had several projects in the works during the early 1980s. In addition to designing Epcot, it was hard at work on plans for Tokyo Disneyland, the first foreign Disney park. Tokyo Disneyland opened April 15, 1983, and was an immediate success in a country that had always loved anything Disney. Now that the Japanese had their own Disneyland, they flocked to it in increasing numbers.

                                                      Moviemaking also was changing in America in the early 1980s. Audiences were diminishing for the family films that had been the mainstay of the Company for many years, and Disney was not meeting the competition for films that attracted the huge teenage and adult market. To reverse that trend, Disney established a new label, Touchstone Pictures, with the release of Splash in 1984. At the same time, because of the widespread perception that Disney stock was undervalued relative to the company’s assets, two “corporate raiders” attempted to take over Disney. The efforts to keep the company from being broken up ended when Michael Eisner and Frank Wells became chairman and president, respectively.

                                                      The new management team immediately saw ways for Disney to maximize its assets. The Company had left network television in 1983 to prepare for the launch of a cable network, The Disney Channel. While the pay-TV service was successful, Eisner and Wells felt Disney should have a strong network presence as well, so in 1985 Disney’s Touchstone division began the immensely successful Golden Girls, followed in 1986 by a return to Sunday night television with the Disney Sunday Movie (later The Magical World of Disney and The Wonderful World of Disney). Films from the Disney library were selected for the syndication market, and some of the classic animated films were released on video cassette. Using the sell-through technique, Disney classics soon reached the top of the all-time best-seller lists.

                                                      The late 1980s brought new innovations to the Parks. At Disneyland, new collaborations with filmmakers George Lucas and Francis Coppola brought Captain EO and Star Tours to the park, and Splash Mountain opened in 1989. Over at Walt Disney World in Florida, Disney’s Grand Floridian Beach and Caribbean Beach Resorts opened in 1988, and three new gated attractions opened in 1989: the Disney-MGM Studios Theme Park, Pleasure Island, and Typhoon Lagoon. More resort hotels opened in 1990 and 1991.

                                                      Filmmaking hit new heights in 1988 as Disney, for the first time, led Hollywood studios in box-office gross. Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Good Morning, Vietnam, Three Men and a Baby, and later, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Dick Tracy, Pretty Woman, and Sister Act each passed the $100 million milestone. Disney moved into new areas by starting Hollywood Pictures and acquiring the Wrather Corp. (owner of the Disneyland Hotel) and television station KHJ (Los Angeles), which was renamed KCAL. In merchandising, Disney purchased Childcraft and opened numerous highly successful and profitable Disney Stores.

                                                      Disney animation began reaching even greater audiences, with The Little Mermaid being topped by Beauty and the Beast in 1991 which was in turn topped by Aladdin in 1992. Hollywood Records was formed to offer a wide selection of recordings ranging from rap to movie soundtracks. New television shows, such as Live With Regis and Kathy Lee, Empty Nest, Dinosaurs, and Home Improvement, expanded Disney’s television base. For the first time in 1991, Disney moved into publishing, forming Hyperion Books, Hyperion Books for Children, and Disney Press, which released books on Disney and non-Disney subjects. Disney purchased Discover magazine, the leading consumer science monthly. As a totally new venture, Disney was awarded in 1993 the franchise for a National Hockey League team, the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim.

                                                      Over in France, the park now known as Disneyland Paris opened on April 12, 1992. Eagerly anticipated, the beautifully designed park attracted almost 11 million visitors during its first year. Disneyland Paris is complemented by six uniquely designed resort hotels and a campground. Dixie Landings and Port Orleans, and a well-received Disney Vacation Club enlarged lodging possibilities at the Walt Disney World Resort, while Mickey’s Toontown and Indiana Jones Adventure helped increase attendance at Disneyland. Walt Disney World opened the All-Star Resorts, Wilderness Lodge, The Twilight Zone Tower of Terror, Blizzard Beach, the BoardWalk Resort, Coronado Springs Resort, The Disney Institute, Downtown Disney West Side, and redesigned Tomorrowland in Magic Kingdom Park.

                                                      The Disney success with animated films continued in 1994 with The Lion King, which soon became one of the highest-grossing films of all time. It was followed by Pocahontas in 1995, The Hunchback of Notre Dame in 1996, Hercules in 1997, Mulan in 1998, Tarzan in 1999, and then Fantasia/2000 at the turn of the century. Toy Story pioneered computer-animation techniques, and was followed by successful sequels. Disney also continued its strong presence in children’s animated programs for television and found success with sequels to animated features released directly to the video market.

                                                      In 1994, Disney ventured onto Broadway with a very successful stage production of Beauty and the Beast, followed in 1997 by a unique staging of a show based on The Lion King and in 2000 by Aida. By restoring the historic New Amsterdam Theatre on 42nd Street, Disney became the catalyst for a successful makeover of the famous Times Square area. A musical version of The Hunchback of Notre Dame opened in Berlin, Germany in 1999.

                                                      By 1996, there were more than 450 Disney Stores worldwide, and by 1999 that number was up to 725. In Florida, the first home sites were sold in the new city of Celebration, located next to Walt Disney World. Eventually, 20,000 people would call Celebration their home. After the death of the owner Gene Autry, Disney acquired the California Angels baseball team to add to its hockey team, and in 1997 opened Disney’s Wide World of Sports at Walt Disney World.

                                                      Early in 1996, Disney completed its acquisition of Capital Cities/ABC. The $19 billion transaction, second-largest in U.S. history, brought the country’s top television network to Disney, in addition to 10 TV stations, 21 radio stations, seven daily newspapers, and ownership positions in four cable networks.

                                                      The years that followed saw the release of a group of very popular live-action films, such as Mr. Holland’s Opus, The Rock, Ransom, Flubber, Con Air, Armageddon, and culminating in the hugely successful The Sixth Sense, which soon reached the 10th spot among the all-time highest grossing releases. Computer animation was showcased in a bug’s life and Dinosaur.

                                                      A whole new park, Disney’s Animal Kingdom, opened at Walt Disney World in 1998. With a gigantic Tree of Life as its centerpiece, the park was Disney’s largest, spanning 500 acres. A major attraction was the Kilimanjaro Safaris, where Guests could experience live African animals in an amazingly accurate reproduction of the African savannah. An Asian area opened at Animal Kingdom in 1999. Back in California, Tomorrowland at Disneyland was redesigned in 1998.

                                                      As the world moved toward a new century, Epcot became the host of Millennium Celebration, Test Track (the longest and fastest Disney park attraction) opened, and other attractions were revised and updated. The Walt Disney Company welcomed a new president—Robert A. Iger—and the Company reached the $25 billion revenue threshold for the first time.

                                                      Disney regional entertainment expanded with DisneyQuest and the ESPN Zone in 1998, and that same year, the Disney Magic, the first of two luxury cruise ships, made its maiden voyage to the Caribbean, stopping at Disney’s own island paradise, Castaway Cay.

                                                      The year 2000 opened with the release in IMAX theaters of an almost totally new version of Fantasia entitled Fantasia/2000. Other classically animated features were The Emperor’s New Groove, Atlantis: The Lost Empire, Lilo & Stitch, Treasure Planet, and Brother Bear. Continuing collaborations with Pixar brought the computer-animated blockbuster Monsters, Inc. Popular live-action productions continued with Remember the Titans, Mission to Mars, Pearl Harbor, The Princess Diaries, and The Rookie. The new cable network, SoapNet, was launched, and award-winning productions on ABC included The Miracle Worker, Anne Frank, and Child Star: The Shirley Temple Story.

                                                      DVD releases became increasingly popular, especially when the company began adding generous amounts of bonus material for viewers. The Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs DVD in 2001 sold more than one million units on the first day of release.

                                                      For the first time, in 2001, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts opened two new theme parks in the same year. In February, Disney’s California Adventure opened after several years of major construction, which transformed the entire Anaheim area. The new park celebrated the history, culture, and spirit of California, with areas ranging from a Hollywood Pictures Backlot to the amusements of Paradise Pier. Joining it was an upscale shopping area, Downtown Disney and the Grand Californian Hotel, celebrating the Craftsman style of architecture. Across the Pacific in Japan, Tokyo DisneySea opened in September, looking to the myths, legends, and lore of the ocean as the inspiration for its attractions and shows. March 2002 saw the opening of another foreign park, Walt Disney Studios, featuring the history and lore and excitement of the movies, adjacent to Disneyland Paris. Ground was broken in January 2003 for Hong Kong Disneyland.

                                                      In 2001, The Walt Disney Company honored the 100th Anniversary of the birth of its founder, Walt Disney. The celebration, called “100 Years of Magic,” was centered at the Disney-MGM Studios theme park in Florida, and included several parades, an exhibit of archival memorabilia, and the installation of a gigantic Mickey’s sorcerer cap in the Chinese Theater plaza.

                                                      The year 2003 saw two Disney films grossing more than $300 million at the box office—Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl and Disney•Pixar’s Finding Nemo. In fact, Disney became the first studio in history to surpass $3 billion in global box office. In October, Mission: Space opened at Epcot to great acclaim, and the following month the Company celebrated the 75th anniversary of Mickey Mouse. As the year drew to a close the Pop Century Resort opened at Walt Disney World.

                                                      After years of partnering, Disney acquired The Muppets and Bear in the Big Blue House in April 2004. Senator George Mitchell became chairman of the board, and movie theaters welcomed The Incredibles. ABC had a rebirth with such popular series as Desperate Housewives, Lost, and Grey’s Anatomy.

                                                      A major anniversary came in 2005 as Disneyland celebrated its 50th, and all of the Disney theme parks joined in a Happiest Celebration on Earth. A brand-new theme park, Hong Kong Disneyland, opened in September, and fall saw the successful releases of Chicken Little and The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. Robert A. Iger took over as CEO of The Walt Disney Company on October 1 with the retirement of Michael Eisner.

                                                      In 2006 High School Musical aired on Disney Channel and become an overnight sensation. In May, Disney made a major purchase of Pixar Animation Studios. Disney•Pixar’s Cars was released in June. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest beat Company records to become the company’s highest grossing feature after its July release. Disney parks celebrated the Year of a Million Dreams with special promotions.

                                                      With 2007 came another popular release from Pixar, Ratatouille, and Disney had its first co-production in China—The Secret of the Magic Gourd. The year ended with the hits Enchanted and National Treasure: Book of Secrets. The third Pirates of the Caribbean feature, subtitled At World’s End, became the top-grossing film of the year internationally. Disney Channel reached new heights with High School Musical 2, and Hannah Montana shot Miley Cyrus to stardom. In the summer, Disney acquired Club Penguin. At the parks, Disney built on the Pixar brand with the Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage at Disneyland, The Seas with Nemo and Friends at Epcot, and Finding Nemo—The Musical at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.

                                                      At Disney parks in 2008, Disney-MGM Studios was renamed Disney’s Hollywood Studios, Toy Story Midway Mania! opened there and at Disney’s California Adventure, and it’s a small world opened at Hong Kong Disneyland. The Company reacquired ownership of the Disney Stores’ retail locations from The Children’s Place, and the first Disney-operated language training center, Disney English, opened in China. In theaters, audiences flocked to WALL•E and Bolt. Tinker Bell, the first of a series of Disney Fairies films, was released, and Camp Rock and Phineas and Ferb debuted on Disney Channel. Then, all the way on a stage under the sea, The Little Mermaid opened on Broadway.

                                                      The big news in 2009 was the acquisition of Marvel Entertainment. The films Up (which would win two Oscars), the first Disneynature film, Earth, and with a return to hand-drawn animation, The Princess and the Frog, were in theaters that year. The first Disney film locally produced in Russia, The Book of Masters, was released. D23: The Official Disney Fan Club launched, Disney twenty-three magazine began publication, and the first biennial D23 Expo was held in Anaheim. Bay Lake Tower opened at Walt Disney World, and a Disney Vacation Club section was added to the Grand Californian Hotel. Disney XD replaced Toon Disney, and at the end of the year the Company mourned the passing of Roy E. Disney.

                                                      In business news in 2010, the Company sold Miramax. Alice in Wonderland and Toy Story 3 were released, and they would go on to win two Oscars each. Also on movie screens were Tangled and Tron: Legacy. Video gamers entered the world of Epic Mickey, and World of Color debuted at the renamed Disney California Adventure.

                                                      The year 2011 saw the launch of the Disney Dream and the repositioning of the Disney Wonder to the West Coast. The Company purchased the rights to the Avatar franchise for theme parks, Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa opened in Hawai‘i, The Little Mermaid: Ariel’s Undersea Adventure debuted at Disney California Adventure, and groundbreaking ceremonies were held for Shanghai Disneyland. In theaters, Disney began distributing DreamWorks films, with The Help winning wide acclaim and a Supporting Actress Oscar for Octavia Spencer. Disney films included Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Winnie the Pooh, The Muppets (Oscar for Best Song), and Cars 2. In New York, Sister Act opened on Broadway and Peter and the Starcatcher off-Broadway.

                                                      In theaters in 2012 were John Carter, Brave, Wreck-It Ralph, Frankenweenie, Lincoln (DreamWorks), and Marvel Studios’ The Avengers. Bob Iger took on the additional title of chairman of the board, and Alan Horn became chairman of The Walt Disney Studios. The Disney Junior cable channel replaced SOAPnet. On Broadway, Newsies opened and won two Tony Awardsâ. Cars Land opened at Disney California Adventure, and the Disney Fantasy set sail. At the Walt Disney World, Disney’s Art of Animation Resort, an enlarged and enhanced Fantasyland, and a new Test Track opened. D23 sponsored a Treasures of the Walt Disney Archives exhibit at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum. The big corporate news was the acquisition of Lucasfilm Ltd.

                                                      The beginning of 2013 saw a big achievement for Tokyo Disneyland. On April 15, it celebrated its 30th anniversary, naming it “The Happiness Year.” New additions came to the theme parks, with Fantasy Faire opening in Disneyland and Mystic Point at Hong Kong Disneyland. Box office smashes, including Iron Man 3 and Thor: The Dark World arrived in theaters. After 12 years, fans were able to travel back in time to see Mike and Sully go to school in Monsters University, and hearts melted in November when audiences adventured into the world of Arendelle for the first time with the Academy Award-winning film Frozen.The year 2014 got off to a great start with Seven Dwarfs Mine Train opening in Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World. And, over at Walt Disney Studios Park at Disneyland Paris, Ratatouille: L’Aventure Totalement Toquée de Rémy made its debut. It was also a good year for films when the Company introduced audiences to a new, yet familiar set of horns when Maleficent premiered. Guardians of the Galaxy and Big Hero 6 flew into theaters and were critical and box-office smashes.

                                                      In 2015, the live-action film Cinderella reminded us to have courage and be kind. While the film provided many emotional moments, it wasn’t long after that we came face-to-face with all of them—literally—with Disney•Pixar’s Inside Out. Marvel Studios’ Ant-Man debuted in July, and the fourth D23 Expo took place in August at Anaheim. Then, that galaxy far, far away moved a closer when Star Wars: The Force Awakens debuted in December.

                                                      In 2016 Zootopia premiered in March. Then, it animals of a very different kind pounced onto the screen in the live-action The Jungle Book. Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge had its official groundbreaking, and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story arrived in theaters on December 16. Moana and Doctor Strange were two other box-office smashes in 2016.

                                                      Hong Kong became home to the first Marvel-themed ride at any Disney park in 2017 when Iron Man Experience opened. While guests were joining Iron Man in an epic adventure of a lifetime (as well as a fight against evil), guests at Walt Disney World traveled to a new world when Pandora—The World of Avatar opened in Disney’s Animal Kingdom. May also saw the release of Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 and the opening of a new attraction, Guardians of the Galaxy – Mission: BREAKOUT! at Disney California Adventure.

                                                      Later in the year, Miguel and Dante introduced us to the power of family in the Academy Award winner Coco. Then, Star Wars: The Last Jedi premiered in December and continued the saga of Rey, Poe, Finn, and Kylo Ren.

                                                      2018 began, not with a bang, but with a star. Minnie Mouse, was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, joining her pals Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck. In February, Marvel introduced us to the newest hero to join the Avengers with Black Panther, which would go on to break several records and win multiple Oscars. We saw a childhood favorite unfold before us in A Wrinkle in Time, while also greeting some beloved characters once more in Christopher Robin. Lucasfilm and Marvel Studios also brought back some favorites with Solo: A Star Wars Story and Ant-Man and The Wasp, and Marvel also delivered the biggest movie of the year globally with Avengers: Infinity War. November and December saw the releases of The Nutcracker and the Four Realms and Mary Poppins Returns, respectively.

                                                      On Broadway the stage got a bit chillier when Disney Frozen The Broadway Musical premiered. Pixar Pier also made its debut at Disney California Adventure, and across the way, The Tropical Hideaway opened in Adventureland at Disneyland. As if that wasn’t enough, brand-new way to explore, play, and listen in the parks arrived with the launch of the Play Disney app.

                                                      For more than nine decades, The Walt Disney Company has created entertainment of the very highest quality. From humble beginnings as a cartoon studio in the 1920s to the company of today—which includes Pixar, Marvel, Lucasfilm and 21 st Century Fox, Disney continues to provide quality entertainment for the entire family all around the world.


                                                      Disney-Pixar history: How the first Pixar film “Toy Story” evolved to “Toy Story 4”

                                                      From “Toy Story” to “Toy Story 4,” Pixar has evolved in more ways than one since the studios’ very first film. Since “Toy Story” was first released in theaters in 1995, Pixar Studios has been acquired by The Walt Disney Company, produced 20 films and dozens of shorts, and created countless stories that have won over the hearts of people of all ages. “Toy Story” has evolved significantly between the first and the fourth film in the series, but even with advances in animation, technology, and resources over the past two decades, the story of Woody, Buzz, and the rest of the gang is still one we know and love.

                                                      Inside the Magic recently had the opportunity to sit down Bill Reeves, global technology supervisor, and Bob Pauley, production designer, of “Toy Story 4,” who shared some insight on Disney-Pixar history and how the studios’ first film, “Toy Story,” evolved to become “Toy Story 4.”

                                                      When we think of “Toy Story,” Woody and Buzz come to mind no matter what. But the two most recognizable characters from the film series weren’t always who they are today. Woody and Buzz were once a ventriloquist dummy and an astronaut hero called Lunar Larry, and as you can imagine, those two character’s didn’t really stick. They evolved to become the two lead characters in a story about a beloved old-fashion cowboy whose life is upended by the arrival of the latest and greatest toy. “It became a classic buddy movie,” said Reeves. The two toys have to learn how to live and work together.

                                                      Reeves shared that the team knew they had a good story when they pitched “Toy Story,” and the story itself is the most important element of Pixar films. “Story is king in Pixar,” said Reeves. “It’s key and vital to all our films. Without a good story with engaging characters, no amount of design or technology built will matter at all.”

                                                      But a good story isn’t enough to create an animated classic. The Pixar team had a great story to tell, but they faced a number of challenges along the way. Not only were there design challenges it would also be the first feature film for Pixar, and, Reeves admits, in many ways, the team didn’t know what they were doing. The animation team grew from three people to over 50, and every other team grew exponentially, as well, in order to produce “Toy Story.” And even with a larger team, Pixar was still limited in its capabilities in animation when producing “Toy Story” compared to what the studios could do when making “Toy Story 4” over two decades later. In fact, the main reason why the first Pixar film was based on toys as characters is because toys, specifically plastic toys, were the most efficient to handle when rendering animation.

                                                      “Toy Story was a struggle between having rich and believable characters and environments versus fitting in the box of the tools, the budget, and the release date of the film. We were essentially designing within the restrictions that we had,” Reeves shared.

                                                      And as you can see, the “Toy Story” films were brought to life more and more realistically as animation technology advanced over the years. There wasn’t much of a difference in the look and feel of “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 2” since the films were released only 4 years apart from each other. But by the time “Toy Story 3” hit theaters in 2010, 11 years after the second film in the series was released, there was a noticeable difference in the overall experience of “Toy Story 3.” There were significant advances in the software available, the studios grew in size, and there was a huge influx of talented artists and practitioners working on the films. In producing “Toy Story 3,” the team at Pixar was able to build much more organic and flexible models and everything truly came together to tell such an emotional ending of a story through excellent, believable animation.

                                                      That brings us to “Toy Story 4,” the fourth and most technologically advanced film since the first animated classic in a series that started it all. It has been 9 years since “Toy Story 3” was released in theaters, and when comparing all films together side by side, it’s not hard to spot the differences. In “Toy Story 4,” the characters are richer and livelier, the movie is cinematic in a widescreen format, the sets are hyper-detailed, the toys have more varied textures, the shading lighting mimics illumination in real life. “Toy Story 4” is as realistic looking as an animated film can get.

                                                      The toys became richer and more detailed, and the worlds became more believable, but even seeing “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 4” side-by-side, you can tell that it’s still the same world and the same story we all know and love. “We want to stay visually consistent within the world. So within each movie, we’re consistent, but we’re doing our best to be consistent throughout the different movies. We want to bring richness and texture to it, but we still want to keep a level of stylization.” said Pauley. It’s true that “Toy Story 4” gives more of the illusion of real-life than the first film does. But it’s still the same world of beloved toy characters that so many of us can’t get enough of.

                                                      The advances in technology between “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 4” are best understood with a rain sequence. Pauley and Reeves discussed how John Lasseter wanted a rainstorm in “Toy Story” to set the mood, but Reeves had to tell Lasseter that they were unable to create a realistic rainstorm or have rain interacting with any of the characters. The “Toy Story” team had to work with the tools they had to tell the story, and they decided to use rain as an exterior backdrop and depict raindrops in the interior of Andy’s bedroom window. Even this rain scene in the first “Toy Story” took one person “maybe a month” to complete.

                                                      But in “Toy Story 4,” the team finally was able to successfully animate rain with much less limitations than they had over two decades prior. It took around 6 months and the largest portion of the effects budget to build the rain sequence in the beginning of “Toy Story 4,” but it was pivotal in order to set up the departure of Bo Peep and create such an emotional moment for the toys. “It was the money shot,” Reeves said.

                                                      A lot has changed for Pixar between “Toy Story” and “Toy Story 4,” but as fans, we’d agree that everything has changed for the better. We can’t wait to see the full-length “Toy Story 4” in person when it hits theaters on June 21, and even though the film’s elements and characters look significantly more lifelike than they did in “Toy Story,” we know we’ll fall in love with this movie just as much as we did 24 years ago.

                                                      Tickets for Toy Story 4 are available for pre-sale now. Want to learn more about Pixar and Toy Story 4?

                                                      Don’t miss our other articles from the same set of interviews and stay tuned to Inside the Magic as we share more insights from the creative team behind Toy Story 4 coming to theatres June 21.


                                                      Toy Story 3

                                                      Eleven years later, Toy Story 3 was released June 18, 2010. Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Don Rickles, Estelle Harris, John Morris, Laurie Metcalf, R. Lee Ermey and Jeff Pidgeon reprise their roles of Woody, Buzz, Jessie, Rex, Hamm, Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head, Andy, Andy's Mom, Sarge and the Aliens. Jim Varney died shortly after the release of Toy Story 2 so the role of Slinky Dog went to Blake Clark. Bo Peep, Wheezy, and Zurg made silent cameos in the film. The sequel features Andy all grown and prepared to head for college and his remaining toys - Woody, Buzz, Jessie, Rex, Hamm, The Potato Heads, The Aliens, Slinky, and Bullseye - mistakenly being donated to a daycare center and then racing to get home before Andy leaves.

                                                      Toy Story 4

                                                      It was announced on November 6, 2014 that Pixar was working on Toy Story 4, which was released in theaters on June 21, 2019. The film focuses on a new "toy" that Bonnie creates named Forky, and Woody helping him realize what being a toy is all about.


                                                      Watch the video: Remember When Pixar Accidentally DELETED Toy Story 2? (January 2022).